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Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Tech fest love-in looks like a success
Beth Stackpole   5/4/2012 6:49:05 AM
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What a great way to expose kids to all the possibilities of technology and engineering in ways that seem creative and fun. More of this kind of hands-on experience and exposure to engineering's "rock stars," as you say, does volumes to whet our kids' appetites for STEM careers.

apresher
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Blogger
Tech Fest Showcases Young Engineers
apresher   5/4/2012 8:58:03 AM
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Excellent slide show.  We need to do all we can to promote technology to the brightest and best students. Important priority.

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Tech Fest Showcases Young Engineers
Beth Stackpole   5/4/2012 3:47:01 PM
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Sometimes you don't even have to bring your kids to these tech fests to get them exposure to the fun side of STEM. My kids did that hydrogen experiment on the dollar bill in school and brought it home to amaze their parents. It was pretty cool.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Tech Fest Showcases Young Engineers
mrdon   5/6/2012 11:47:36 PM
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Beth, I agree. You can expose kids to STEM actitivies everyday just by bringing a bunch of techno-goodies to their classrooms and letting them explore the wonders of science and technology by teardown activities. I promote STEM by visiting my kids' classroom and discussing careers in electrical and computer engineering with hands-on demos using the Basic Stamp kits. I'm also getting involve with Innovation Generation by providing project excerpts from my new book titled "Learning Electronics with Arduino" coming out 5/23/12 for kids to do cool projects over the summer break as well!

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Good inspiration
Charles Murray   5/4/2012 6:13:18 PM
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I'm not surprised to see the throng, given the celebrities (Homer Hickam, Bill Nye and an astronaut) at the event. I still say that Hickam's book inspired the best science movie ever made. It may be the only Hollywood movie in which a bright young science student is portrayed as a normal child.

George Leopold
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Blogger
Re: Good inspiration
George Leopold   5/7/2012 9:13:25 AM
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Homer Hickam told us that the initial portrayal of the good folks of Coalwood, W. Va., in October Sky was originally full of hillbilly stereotypes about coal miners. He urged director Joe Johnston to drop the stereotypes and show the dignity of work above and below ground. After all, it was the people of Coalwood who made it possible for Homer to pursue his dreams. (Incidentally, Hickam said Chris Cooper, who played Homer's father, received little or no direction during filming. He just ran with the character and, accurately, for my money, portrayed the tensions between father and his independent-minded son.)

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Good inspiration
Charles Murray   5/7/2012 6:38:55 PM
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It's worth mentioning that "October Sky" has inspired thousands of high school physics students to partake in projects outside of class. I've heard of physics classes watching the movie together. The movie (and/or book) has also inspired an annual Coalwood Festival and, incredibly, an October Sky trivia website.  

http://www.coalwoodwestvirginia.com/october_sky_festival.htm

http://www.funtrivia.com/playquiz/quiz21757618e99c8.html

 

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
A great thing
Cadman-LT   5/7/2012 2:56:15 AM
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This is such a great thing. Not only promoting STEM, but making it cool is a great thing. I wish I would have had this kind of motivation and outlet back when I was a kid. It is more important now more than ever for kids to get into it. 

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Multiple Locations and Johnson Space Center
Nancy Golden   5/7/2012 9:53:10 AM
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What an amazing event! It would really be cool if they could do multiple locations across the country - not just D.C.

One thing I really miss that was along those lines was the NASA open house that used to be held at the Johnson Space Center. It was very family oriented and was a wonderful experience. My son was only two at the time we went - he got to shake the hand of Rick Husband that day. We are going back around twelve years or so - and I was hoping to make it a family event that would really get him excited about science as he grew up. It was packed when we went, but for some reason NASA discontinued them. What a shame because it would have really been a great way to continue to inspire kids to get involved in science and space.

kf2qd
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Platinum
Tech - Or entertainment...
kf2qd   5/7/2012 10:30:18 AM
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Seen a lot of what they call STEM and a lot of it looks more like entertainment to me. The problem with real technology is that there is a chance of injury, but there is also much more opportunity to learn.

What is really learned by the dollar bill dipped in Hydrogen?

Too many of the STEM related projects I have seen are way too contrained and yield very similar results and many of the programs don't really allow the time for the postmortem to figure out why it failed. Success is great, but we tend to learn more from our mistakes, and we have a culture where we don't want our kids to ever have to learn from failure.

How about some STEM where they learn to use basic tools, maybe even some basic machine tols, some welding and then let them create something subtantial. More like the college level car building projects.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tech - Or entertainment...
NadineJ   5/7/2012 11:26:29 AM
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At the K-12 level, it has to be fun to keep their interest and foster more curiousity.  And,  that leads to the more substantive work you're discussing.  Making it too serious, or like school,  at this stage could be a turn-off for many kids.

3drob
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Platinum
Re: Tech - Or entertainment...
3drob   5/8/2012 8:35:08 AM
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The show was definately fun.  It was a huge venue (I went with my daughter and her friend) and was absolutely packed with people.  We were only able to see a small portion of what was there.  Gave me some hope for the future seeing the attendance so high ...

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Tech - Or entertainment...
Charles Murray   5/8/2012 9:27:06 PM
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Although I didn't attend the show, I like the idea of this show and others like it. Too often, smart kids have to suffer through the nerd image -- as if they are in some way abnormal for being interested in science and engineering. Shows like this one give me hope that someone understands how important it is for bright kids to have a venue for their interests outside the classroom.  

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Tech - Or entertainment...
Mydesign   5/8/2012 4:53:25 AM
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1 saves
 Kf2qd, some of the science techniques can harm kids also, like burning oxygen using H2SO4 for burning cloths, lens to concentrate heat etc. In my college days, I had a similar bad experience with Sulfuric acid and burned my skin.

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Exposure is key
ChasChas   5/7/2012 3:21:26 PM
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Great slide.

With enough exposure, everyone finds their "click".

Tim
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Platinum
Re: Exposure is key
Tim   5/7/2012 9:17:25 PM
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Exposure is a good thing.  It lets kids see what does and does not interest them in a fun way. 

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Young Scientist
Mydesign   5/8/2012 4:49:31 AM
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1 saves
George, kids are the next generation scientists and engineers. Science exhibitions and expos can fuel their ideas and innovations. More over such activities can ignite or spark them to think in different ways.



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