HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>
Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Like to have one
Cadman-LT   5/7/2012 2:32:17 AM
NO RATINGS
I will say though, that even at this point I would love to have one. So the act of making them affordable to everyone is a good one. Although I doubt most would want one I know anyone into 3d modeling and CAD would love to own one. If even just to show what they can make! 

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
More than just toys and plastics
Cadman-LT   5/7/2012 2:28:02 AM
NO RATINGS
I have been watching this technology for awhile now. All of the 3d printing. It seems to be just plastics and modeling. I would like to think they could adapt this to print liquid metals such as aluminum. Then you would be able to make actual useable parts. Now that would be something!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robots strolling in the grass
Rob Spiegel   5/4/2012 1:10:46 PM
NO RATINGS
I had a bunch of PCs, Ann. At the time I owned a publishing company, and the only practical computers to own ($$ matched against function) were PCs. Interestingly, when we brought production inhouse we had to buy Macs. They were far ahead of PCs when it came to graphics. Much of the advanced graphic software wasn't even available on the PC. That started a long-standing division in publishing companies that still exists to some extent -- editorial uses PC and art uses Apple.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robots strolling in the grass
Ann R. Thryft   5/4/2012 12:20:40 PM
NO RATINGS

That sounds pretty awful. The only DOS machines I had to use were those of employers. I had no interest in buying a PC until the Mac came out, I used it at work, and was amazed at the difference.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robots strolling in the grass
Rob Spiegel   5/4/2012 11:03:08 AM
NO RATINGS
You are certainly right about that, Ann. I can't believe how much code I had to learn just to keep the computer going. All I was using was word processing and a database. But if you didn't learn the code to repair thye crashes, you couldn't keep your PC going.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robots strolling in the grass
Ann R. Thryft   5/3/2012 4:30:42 PM
NO RATINGS

That's the way I remember the sequence, too, Rob. Except that MS-DOS was really awful for anyone but an engineer to use. I had several hours of training and could not remember much when it got down to making anything work. The cryptic error messages and text format made it really hard to have any idea of where you were or what had just happened, or what to do next. The Mac's GUI is what made me want to use computers--intuitively obvious, just like they said.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robots strolling in the grass
Rob Spiegel   5/3/2012 1:57:40 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree about MS-DOS, Ann. I'll never forget when IBM announced the PC. It seemed like the announcement was nearly a year before they (and their clones) started to deliver the PC. All of the models except for Apple disappeared almost instantly. The way I remember it, businesses knew they had to start investing in personal computers, but they were nervous about what to buy. Once IBM announced the PC, they put off all their purchase plans until the first PCs arrived. Killed the market for everybody else. Except for Apple.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robots strolling in the grass
Ann R. Thryft   5/3/2012 1:05:27 PM
NO RATINGS

Chuck, I remember the Tandy, and a lot of other models of PC that have gone into history. I think at the height there were about 25 different brands, all proprietary, from 25 different manufacturers, that all worked differently. It was a nightmare. Given that environment it's easy to see the appeal of MS-DOS.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Content the tricky part
Beth Stackpole   5/3/2012 11:49:53 AM
NO RATINGS
Your raise a good point, Naperlou. Not all engineers can think creatively from both a problem solving standpoint and a creative design standpoint. That said, This particular technology is really more to whet the appetite of the consumer/hobbyist/do-it-yourself market for 3D printing, inclusive of some enterprising engineers, I would think.

The content creation piece is one of the holes, however. Even as these 3D printers get cheaper and easily to use and maintain, the software to build the 3D models of what's printed is still more sophisticated than the average Joe. That's where technology like Robot Nation comes in. It doesn't require knowledge of CAD or any other sophisticated 3D design tool.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Content the tricky part
naperlou   5/3/2012 9:54:36 AM
NO RATINGS
Beth, the issue of content creation is one that comes up a lot.  I was looking at a gaming software solution for a project that was not really a game.  The game development environment is great, but a lot of the work is creating the objects that go into the game.  Engineering is a creative process by its nature, but it is a problem solving creativity.  There is a different type of creativity that goes into making the shapes that you would want to print.  This could be a useful acquisition.

<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
With erupting concern over police brutality, law enforcement agencies are turning to body-worn cameras to collect evidence and protect police and suspects. But how do they work? And are they even really effective?
A half century ago, cars were still built by people, not robots. Even on some of the country’s longest assembly lines, human workers installed windows, doors, hoods, engines, windshields, and batteries, with no robotic aid.
DuPont's Hytrel elastomer long used in automotive applications has been used to improve the way marine mooring lines are connected to things like fish farms, oil & gas installations, buoys, and wave energy devices. The new bellow design of the Dynamic Tethers wave protection system acts like a shock absorber, reducing peak loads as much as 70%.
As U.S. manufacturing booms, companies are beginning to invest in new equipment.
Automobili Lamborghini is joining the ranks of supercar makers who are moving to greener powertrains.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 15 - 19, An Introduction to Web Application Security
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service