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naperlou
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Give me more cores!
naperlou   4/27/2012 9:22:20 AM
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Chuck, that is an interesting development.  Lower clock speeds mean less power drawn, that is true.  Automotive applications (especoally engine control) consist of a large number of calculations done repetitively in a short time.  Couple the extra cores with virtualization software and you can get great performance with lots less power.

Charles Murray
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Re: Give me more cores!
Charles Murray   4/27/2012 5:48:39 PM
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I agree, Naperlou. It's interesting to see that multicore is gaining ground, not just because of its raw processing power, but because it offers lower power consumption.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Give me more cores!
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   4/29/2012 8:23:00 PM
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Not to mention running cooler, and avoiding any heat-sinking design concerns.

ChasChas
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Re: Give me more cores!
ChasChas   4/30/2012 1:34:07 PM
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Also evident is this allows the use of more complex sensors - thus better input data.

Charles Murray
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Re: Give me more cores!
Charles Murray   4/30/2012 6:03:17 PM
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I would think that multicore might also help automakers do what they've been trying to do for years -- that is, cut the number of microcontrollers in vehicles. Some of the more complex high-end vehicles are now using 80 or 90 MCUs each.

Pedro_C
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Iron
Re: Give me more cores!
Pedro_C   7/15/2014 10:34:51 AM
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Hi Charles, I work on the Ignition powertrain, and some of the applications uses a mC in each ignition coil, so it could help a lot on this area, but some Customers want to have a dedicated uC to each component so, it is a high management agrement what drives any change.

Jon Titus
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2 Cores + 1
Jon Titus   4/30/2012 7:36:11 PM
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Two of the cores serve as basic microprocessors and one handles all of the I/O controls, which makes a lot of sense because I/O operations and handling various streams of serial data from sensors, microcontrollers, and wireless links could weigh heavily on the dual core portion of the chip. The 3-processor chip offers some redundancy as well as error-detection and error-correction technologies, mandatory for safety-critical equipment.

The Freescale processor will run the AUTOSAR operating system, available from other software suppliers.  For information, visit: http://www.autosar.org/download/R4.0/AUTOSAR_SWS_OS.pdf.  I believe version 4 supports multicore processors.

tekochip
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Performance Boost
tekochip   5/1/2012 9:04:54 AM
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I've seen two performance advantages from a multicore design. Since many high-end designs use an OS that time slices the various tasks performed by the application, a multicore can now devote an entire core to a specific task. The next boost is from designs that had multiple processors. Rather than having a communication link between the various processors, the processors now share the same resources and cohabitate together without having to communicate.




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