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uniquity@uniquitypsych.com
User Rank
Gold
Re: That DARN hidden cutout, etal!!!
uniquity@uniquitypsych.com   4/30/2012 2:18:26 PM
NO RATINGS
How do you tell lazy, dumb, and greed apart?  I have had major problems with the manuals that came with several Kenmore appliances.  They don't tell you very much, and what they do tell you is not clomplete or clear.  There are also no aftermarket repair manuals around any more. 

I had a freezer stop working, and the troubleshooting section of the manual did not describe the error code on the digital display. I finally got help by looking at several websites and made some sense of what I found.  The Kenmore manual said that some models had a 9v barrery.  However, it did not say where the battery was located.  The website said it was at the bottom, front of the unit.  Changing the battery solved everything.

This was not an add-on item.  I have no idea as to why the manual did not have clear information about this.  Did Sears want me to have to make a service call?Did the person who wrote the manual know anything about the freezer?  Did anyone who knew about the freezer proof read the manual?

uniquity@uniquitypsych.com
User Rank
Gold
Re: That DARN hidden cutout, etal!!!
uniquity@uniquitypsych.com   4/30/2012 2:18:19 PM
NO RATINGS
How do you tell lazy, dumb, and greed apart?  I have had major problems with the manuals that came with several Kenmore appliances.  They don't tell you very much, and what they do tell you is not clomplete or clear.  There are also no aftermarket repair manuals around any more. 

I had a freezer stop working, and the troubleshooting section of the manual did not describe the error code on the digital display. I finally got help by looking at several websites and made some sense of what I found.  The Kenmore manual said that some models had a 9v barrery.  However, it did not say where the battery was located.  The website said it was at the bottom, front of the unit.  Changing the battery solved everything.

This was not an add-on item.  I have no idea as to why the manual did not have clear information about this.  Did Sears want me to have to make a service call?Did the person who wrote the manual know anything about the freezer?  Did anyone who knew about the freezer proof read the manual?

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
That DARN hidden cutout, etal!!!
OLD_CURMUDGEON   4/30/2012 10:23:19 AM
NO RATINGS
 

The blogger who suggested that this "safety cutout" was an afterthought to clear the U.S. / Canada safety agencies was probably dead nuts on target!  However, IF they became aware of the need for such a safety overload protector, and had to add it to the BOM, there's no reason why they could not have also added a small stick-on label indicating its presence.  To not do so IS, in my opinion, a demonstration of complete unethical behaviour!

The folks who commented about "commenting" their code, no matter what language or environment ARE also dead nuts on target.  When I started out many decades ago, the first "languages" I learned were AUTOCODER, RPG & FORTRAN on I-B-M 1401 & 1130 computers using Hollerith cards to input the code & data.  Practically EVERY single card of the "program deck" had pencil comments on the back side of it.  I've been profusely commenting ALL my code to this very day, regardless whether it is ASSEMBLER, BASIC, C, PASCAL, or LADDER!  I KNOW that I am replaceable, and have never been of a mind that what I've done cannot be diagnosed by someone else.  Any engineer, programmer, etc. who has that mentality is a disturbed person. 

DB_Wilson
User Rank
Gold
Safety Issue
DB_Wilson   4/30/2012 9:59:02 AM
NO RATINGS
The undocumented circuit breaker (likely a "Supplimental Protector") may have been the result of a failed safety agency test.  When the abnormal tests and fault tests were performed, an unacceptable result may have been addressed by adding the reset device.  The resetable device may have had too much variation for the application or not have been up to the handling or operation requirements of the end product.  As for the instructions, the omission may have been to prevent a user from constantly resetting the device and causing the protector to fail with the contacts closed and create the hazard presented by having no device.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Fuse Unit and power supply
Mydesign   4/30/2012 6:04:01 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
I think in power supply issue, it's always better to check the saftey fuse unit also. In most of the power supply issues, what I had seen is the fuse unit got damaged and blocks further power supply.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Engineering and the RESET button
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   4/29/2012 8:17:57 PM
NO RATINGS

'course on the other hand, if the reset button was at all visible, a natural curiosity might have simply pushed it PRIOR to disassembling the unit.  As a young child, I remember how IMPRESSED I was with my mother when she simply pushed the little red button on the bottom surface of the In-Sink-Erator, and the darn thing roared back to life!  How simple to reset a garbage disposal !! – Often, development EE's request the same reset button on the pre-production prototypes I've helped create.

gsmith120
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Undocumented Feature
gsmith120   4/29/2012 3:00:03 PM
NO RATINGS
I know these people.  Job security went out many years ago.  I find that type of attitude can work against them because they may be viewed as difficult to work with and may be on the layoff list because of it.  They need to realize there is always someone else who can do the same work as them.  While it may be hard for the company to recover but not impossible.  So while they make it difficult for Company X, they may be burning their bridges with Company X and potentially other companies as well.  Just like you said layoffs are common and person at Company X today may later be your interviewer at Company Z tomorrow. 

 

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Undocumented Feature
Nancy Golden   4/29/2012 2:21:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Funny you said, "Also, good comments make it easier for you if you ever have to modify someone else's code" because I always thought so too, which is another reason why I commented mine - for anyone else down the road or for test sets that were moved to our plant in Mexico (which made it easier for them and prevented me from having to travel there to fix things). But I knew some engineers who wouldn't comment their code on purpose - they viewed it as job security. They figured that they would have to be called in to troubleshoot any problems because no one else would be able to figure out what the code was doing. A very bad attitude but when you are working in an industry where lay offs are common place, I could see how it would evolve.  


gsmith120
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Undocumented Feature
gsmith120   4/29/2012 9:01:21 AM
NO RATINGS
I love hearing you comment your code.  I was a design engineer for many years; some of the work I did involved writing VHDL for FPGAs.  As I became more senior I was involved with overseeing other designers as well as reviewing design code.  Kind of a funny story made short which involved me overseeing 32 poorly structured VHDL design files owned by foreign division of the company where I was currently employed.  Whenever the engineers made changes they would comment ALL the old code and insert new code and very rarely many any comments of importance.  I'm like do they really understand the concept of commenting your code?  So they is why when I teach a class on FPGA using VHDL at the university I always stress the importance of GOOD Comments.  Just as you said Nancy you may have to come back to this code at a later date.  Also, good comments make it easier for you if you ever have to modify someone else's code. 

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Engineering
Nancy Golden   4/28/2012 7:53:29 PM
NO RATINGS
I bet you are right! Every time I see one of those I want to open the thing to see what warrants it...

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