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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Lettuce?
Ann R. Thryft   4/30/2012 12:56:28 PM
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Tim, this material is specifically targeted for large-scale agricultural applications, as an alternative to poisonous sprays like Roundup and genetically modified (GM) crops. So is black petro-based plastic, but this material has even more benefits, since it can be plowed under, saving time and cost of removal, and saving the damage done if not removed.


Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Lettuce?
Ann R. Thryft   4/27/2012 12:50:04 PM
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You're welcome. I live in a mostly agricultural county and grew up surrounded by it, so this is a common sight to me. I realize it's less so to many as more people move to cities.


Tim
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Platinum
Re: Lettuce?
Tim   4/26/2012 8:36:56 PM
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Hopefully, this film is available to be applied in a large scale application.  Many large scale farm plants have been genetically engineered to specifically resist herbicides (ie Round Up Ready Corn).  This allows the farmers to spray the entire field to kill weeds while retaining their cash crop.  If this film allows for the farmer to reduce the amount of herbicide and geneticallly engineered seed, it would only be a net gain to consumers.

Tim
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Platinum
Re: They're green, BUT...
Tim   4/26/2012 8:29:48 PM
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It would be rough to hear that much noise first thing in the morning for toast.  At least it would wake you up.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Lettuce?
Charles Murray   4/26/2012 8:17:49 PM
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Thanks, Ann. Since I'm not a gardener, I didn't understand.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Lettuce?
Ann R. Thryft   4/25/2012 12:33:27 PM
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Chuck, that appears to be lettuce or some other leafy vegetable. The thin film is mulch, which you put down around your crop plants to help keep down weeds and retain moisture in the soil. Many people use large sheets of black petro-based plastic, which is highly effective but does not biodegrade quickly and can leave harmful residues. I'm a gardener, not a largescale farmer, but I suspect it's put down before or during planting not after and holes punched through for the plants.


TJ McDermott
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Blogger
Re: They're green, BUT...
TJ McDermott   4/25/2012 1:35:08 AM
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Tim, you are correct, it was the same material. In the instance I described, the bags in question were pre-formed to run on the type of machinery that packages sliced bread. Can you imagine that material when making your kids' lunch sandwiches?

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: They're green, BUT...
Tim   4/24/2012 9:24:54 PM
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These may have been the same bags that Frito Lay introduced for their Sun Chips in 2010.  They were so noisy and had a such a bad feel that the Sun Chip sales actually fell about 10% during the year that they were on the market.  It would be great to see a non-noisy solution that would be bidegradable.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Lettuce?
Charles Murray   4/24/2012 7:32:10 PM
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Ann, I don't understand the thin film photo in slide 4. What's that a picture of? Is it growing through the film?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: They're green, BUT...
Ann R. Thryft   4/24/2012 1:03:36 PM
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TJ, thanks for that input. I heard from several manufacturers of bioplastics and/or recyclable plastics (the BASF Ecoflex/Ecovio peanuts bag is both) that they had spent considerable time and effort getting feedback from users to overcome exactly the unpleasant characteristics you described. The BASF peanuts bag, for example, is not noisy like cellophane when you manipulate it and that specific problem was cited as one they had worked to overcome. So things have changed quite a bit in four years and these materials now exist--I've seen them--but they haven't yet been adopted in quantities that make them visible to end-users. 

And of course, making so-called green materials from food crops, especially corn, is now a no-no.


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