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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Too simple for smart
Ann R. Thryft   5/15/2012 5:20:10 PM
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Sounds like this one could be the source of several Sherlocks.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Too simple for smart
Rob Spiegel   5/15/2012 4:23:44 PM
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There was no final fix in this story, Ann. Perhaps we'll see another Sherlock Ohms story in a couple years when the next set of engineers try to figure out this eventual failure.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Too simple for smart
Ann R. Thryft   5/15/2012 2:41:14 PM
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I guess it's more surprising to me that the owner would make another temporary fix after the first one. Was there actually a final fix?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Too simple for smart
Rob Spiegel   5/14/2012 4:06:57 PM
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Yes, this is the second temporary repair. In some ways the first temporary repair is the most suprising since it sounds like it was done by the vendor during the installation process.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Too simple for smart
Ann R. Thryft   5/14/2012 3:14:16 PM
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I'm also surprised that a temporary repair was made and not a permanent one, since it appears this is the second temporary repair.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Too simple for smart
Rob Spiegel   5/9/2012 12:48:24 PM
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I would guess they went for a permanent stripe, since they would know that the improvised ink line would eventially fail, just as the frist improvised ink line failed.

Charles Murray
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Re: Too simple for smart
Charles Murray   5/4/2012 6:57:11 PM
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The author notes that this was a "temporary fix." I wonder what he used as a permanent fix.

William K.
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Platinum
Poor ink impededs CT scanner.
William K.   4/24/2012 10:04:24 PM
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Insufficient contrast is a very subtle failure mode indeed. The system goes from functioning to intermittant to failed and nothing shows up as the cause. Hartridge has a similar problem with the linear encoders in their fuel injector system teststands, except that it is dirt, not fading. The normal fix is a new encoder for about $450, and two hours wait, and hope the new encoder is in stock. My cheap fix was to clean the scale in the encoder with denatured alcohol and a soft lense wipe tissue. Materials cost is about ten cents and the labor time is about five minutes and no recalibration is needed. But the profit is less, so the customer gets the _____.

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Corrective Action
Greg M. Jung   4/24/2012 9:15:26 PM
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Good article. 

I guess in today's highly regulated environment, this temporary black pen fix would not be enough.  In addition to solving the problem immediately, a root-cause countermeasure would also be needed to be performed by the equipment manufacturer so this problem would not occur again years later.

Noswad
User Rank
Gold
Shoddy repair work!
Noswad   4/24/2012 4:51:07 PM
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Sounds like a bad way to repair something. Could they have not repaired the wheel with a permanent solution. They should have replaced the wheel with a new and good one.

If I were their manager, I would not have allowed that type of repair. It will come back to haunt someone else in the future.

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