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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Smart sufers
Rob Spiegel   5/3/2012 12:52:56 PM
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Yes, I can see why MEMS would provide a more realistic depiction of character movement. I would guess that it comes down to a greater degree of data and thus a higher detailed capture of movement.

Charles Murray
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Re: Smart sufers
Charles Murray   5/2/2012 9:47:13 PM
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MEMS was a nice step forward for moviemaking "mo-cap," Rob. Until they time moviemakers used special suits with luminous markers on them. MEMS gives much more realistic motion, I'm told.  

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Smart sufers
Rob Spiegel   4/24/2012 1:00:33 PM
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Nice article, Chuck. The article offers a good explanation for how body movement is captured for manipulation in movie making. 

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Smart sufers
Rob Spiegel   4/24/2012 11:31:04 AM
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I think this was the technology used in Avatar to get the facial expressions of the actors onto the alien characters. They fitted the actors with facial sensors so they could capture emotional expressions.

jmiller
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Re: Smart sufers
jmiller   4/23/2012 8:42:57 PM
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I wonder how far we are from being able to record the perfect golf swing and then compare yours to the one on the screen.  We all know several people will do whatever they can to improve their ability in the sports arena.  I don't think it will be long before the technology allows everyone to hit the ball like Tiger Woods.  Now the interesting part for me will be to see if the perfectly trained athelete will be as good as the naturally trained.  Can computers and science replace natural ability?  Or will science reach it's limits before human nature which can go the extra mile.

Charles Murray
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Re: Smart sufers
Charles Murray   4/23/2012 8:38:53 PM
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Rob: I believe they used a technology similar to this in the movie "Iron Man."

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=229322

notarboca
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Gold
Re: Smart sufers
notarboca   4/23/2012 2:52:29 PM
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I have seen applications where Hollywood would dress an actor in a MEMS suit and use the feedback from it to "vitualize" them for use in CGI; much more lifelike than regular computer animation.  I think it has been used for video game design as well.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Smart sufers
Rob Spiegel   4/23/2012 2:43:56 PM
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Interesting suggestion on the movie industry, Notarboca. How do you see this technology used in movies?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Smart sufers
Rob Spiegel   4/23/2012 2:42:16 PM
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Yes, this is like a virtual co-pilot. One application I've seen is that pro golfers and ball players are capturing their expert golf or baseball swings. Users can then match their own swings to the experts to see where they are matching for falling short of the expert's swings.

notarboca
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Re: Smart sufers
notarboca   4/23/2012 11:44:42 AM
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I imagine this technology has been available for some time in the movie industry, what with millions of budget dollars.  Glad to see the form and functionality has advanced to be useful to sporting pursuits.

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