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Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Shutter speed.
Mydesign   4/20/2012 3:26:14 AM
James, normally digital cameras have a shutter speed for 1/500 to 1/5000 of a second. Moreover in a second we can capture maximum of 15 shots. What I understood is that, the mechanical parts/components required a minimum time to complete the process; irrespective of the shutter speed. I mean the system introduce a minimum delay between the frames for completing the capturing process.

I appreciate your effort, can you justify the need for such a fast response system.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cheaper alternative to a high-speed lens
Charles Murray   4/19/2012 7:35:58 PM
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I agree, Naperlou. The article doesn't say how much he spent, but the bill of materials indicates that the most expensive component was the breadboard at $20.19. There's no price listed for the camera, but it's probably no more than that. Amazing.

dajjhman
User Rank
Iron
Re: Schemat
dajjhman   4/19/2012 5:43:34 PM
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Whoops! There is supposed to be a ground symbol there.

my bad

-Jimmy

txhamguy
User Rank
Iron
Schemat
txhamguy   4/19/2012 5:29:48 PM
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There is no ground connection to the SCR in the schematic but the breadboard shows the black lead from the flash connected to the ground of the circuit. Looks like a fun project!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cheaper alternative to a high-speed lens
Rob Spiegel   4/19/2012 3:25:53 PM
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Thanks for submitting a cool gadget, Jimmy. I thought the comment about underwater photography was interesting. Since the flash only occurs at the moment of the shot, there is no light to scare away deep-sea creatures. 

dajjhman
User Rank
Iron
Re: Cheaper alternative to a high-speed lens
dajjhman   4/19/2012 12:35:09 PM
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I haven't scanned most of my high speed negatives (I'm still a film guy for a lot of things and I make my own prints when I do things like this)

I may dig up more negatives later, but a few of my first shots from the initial testing can be found on my website's gallery page (can't post a direct link at the moment): jhartnett.gawsolutions.us

As well you can find details on other projects

 

-Jimmy

And @ Rob, thanks for the feature!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cheaper alternative to a high-speed lens
Rob Spiegel   4/19/2012 11:35:08 AM
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That's a really good question, Nadine. With some modifications, I would imagine it could be used for deep sea. You already have the dark, so it's just a matter of a quick flash for illumination. So you can shoot the fish (so to speak) before it scares.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cheaper alternative to a high-speed lens
NadineJ   4/19/2012 11:16:00 AM
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This is intersting.  Because the shutter has to stay open, the applications are limited.  But, could this be used for deep-sea underwater photography?  Imagine what we haven't seen because sea creatures are avoiding the bright lights used now.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cheaper alternative to a high-speed lens
naperlou   4/19/2012 9:19:59 AM
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It's amazing how few components are required sometimes.  Good project.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Cheaper alternative to a high-speed lens
Beth Stackpole   4/19/2012 6:18:57 AM
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Looks like a pretty interesting solution and likely a lot cheaper (and much more fun) than buying some sort of expensive high-speed lens. I'd love to see the fruits of Hartnett's labors in terms of how his gadget actually performs vis a vie picture quality.

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