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Dave Palmer
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Re: Material Substitution
Dave Palmer   4/17/2012 5:44:54 PM
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@NadineJ: the article indicates that the the new bio-based plasticizers are actually more thermally stable than traditional plasticizers.  So, at least in that regard, they should be an improvement.

By the way, the PVC is still the same old PVC.  What's new are the plasticizers.  By itself, PVC is igid; think of PVC plumbing pipe, for example.  In order to make flexible PVC, chemicals called plasticizers are added.  These chemicals behave like solvents, causing the polymer to soften and swell.

There are a number of health concerns about the phthalate plasticizers which are currently used in PVC.  So, of course, non-phthalate plasticizers are a hot topic right now.  I can imagine that bio-based non-phthalate plasticizers would be an even hotter topic -- especially if they are cheap! So this is quite a significant development.

On a side note: Louis Cappucci is correct that the chlorine in the PVC is ultimately derived from sea salt, but there's nothing special about that; you could say the same about anything which contains chlorine, such as the muriatic acid you buy at the hardware store.  This is just a bit of spin. (It doesn't negate the significance of the new plasticizers, though).

NadineJ
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Platinum
Re: Material Substitution
NadineJ   4/17/2012 2:32:41 PM
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I agree with naperlou, it's great that non-food plant based maaterials are being used.  It shouldn't be an either/or as we develop more earth friendly plastics.

I can't wait to see how these hold up, especially in footwear and consumer electronics.  One issue we've had over the years with eco-friendly materials is that they tend to breakdown too quickly.  Consumers do not tolerate that!  Or, can't handle the high heat needed in the assembly process.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Greener materials
Rob Spiegel   4/17/2012 2:32:32 PM
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I would still think that the plant matter used in these materials would make it an easier breakdown in the landfill. But perhaps the mixture with the plastics would curtail easy decomposition.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Greener materials
Ann R. Thryft   4/17/2012 1:18:38 PM
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Thanks, guys. I was especially happy to see bio-based solutions for vinyl, which is extremely prevalent in so many products. End-of-life issues were not addressed, but vinyl is not one of those plastics that is easily recycled: those that are are likely to be the less durable, single-use ones.


Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Greener materials
Rob Spiegel   4/17/2012 11:28:48 AM
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Nice article, Ann. It's good to see materials coming out that offer improved features while also offering a greener composition. Is there also an end-of-life improvement? Are these materials easier to recycle, or do they breakdown better than traditional plastics because of their plant content?

naperlou
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Blogger
Material Substitution
naperlou   4/17/2012 10:02:32 AM
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This is a great idea.  The fact that it uses non-food plant material is a real plus.  It reminds me of the discussion around the rare earths in magnets discussion.  There are often alternatives, and sometimes they are better.  Good story.

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