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flared0ne
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Size?
flared0ne   5/7/2012 11:01:49 AM
NO RATINGS
I believe in the Navy's mind the functionality and usefulness of the platform is going to depend heavily on what existing weapons packages it can deliver -- almost all of which are less-feasibly deployed on any platform which is significantly smaller. Any approach which reduces the procurement cycle time to achieve weapons on the water (WITHOUT locking us into an early-obsolescence cycle) has a positive design criteria satisfaction gradient -- and iterating toward smaller special purpose platforms is STILL feasible.

I'm still anticipating the RP-jetski with various alternative load packages of torpedo and drone launchers, and probably a range of warhead delivery options.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Size?
Jack Rupert, PE   4/22/2012 3:08:36 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm surprised that they appear to be aiming at full-sized versions of existing ships (39' in this case).  The Air Force, on the other hand seems to be concentrating their efforts on drones that are substantially smaller than the manned version.  Is there a reason for this?

The advantage I see here is that the Navy can complement their other efforts with these type of devices.  For example, the current push is to get away from the massive battleship size and focus on the newer littoral combat ships, which allow action much closer to land and up smaller rivers.  It seems that, properly scaled, these could enhance those capabilities in the same way the drones have done for the Air Force.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Ability to "right itself" from capsized condition
Rob Spiegel   4/19/2012 8:36:14 AM
NO RATINGS
Wow, DB, that is impressive. I looked at some of the self-righting video on YouTube. It's surprising how well those boats handled rough seas.

DB_Wilson
User Rank
Gold
Re: Ability to "right itself" from capsized condition
DB_Wilson   4/18/2012 2:48:11 PM
NO RATINGS
That is is nice test in calm water.  It's much more impressive if you have a crew on board in rough seas.

If you check the other videos, you will see some of the boat handling training in rough water with 4 or 5 crew members onboard.  I recall a show on Discovery Channel or History Channel that showed a boat roll over and right itself in the rough conditions while doing training.  The crew was 'strapped in' for their safety and survival.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Ability to "right itself" from capsized condition
Rob Spiegel   4/18/2012 2:22:29 PM
NO RATINGS
The whole notion of a self-righting boat was so interesting, I had to see it for myself. Here's what I found: A Coast Guard video of a self-righting boat. Very cool:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXF-TjOjD5k

DB_Wilson
User Rank
Gold
Re: Ability to "right itself" from capsized condition
DB_Wilson   4/18/2012 1:22:47 PM
NO RATINGS
The flotation systems are passive.  The weight and flotation are distributed to have the boat turn uptight.  (Many weighted keel sailboats will do this, too.)  As for the other systems on the boat, I must defer to others. 

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Ability to "right itself" from capsized condition
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   4/18/2012 12:35:29 PM
NO RATINGS
That is so cool !  How does it work-?  I can understand "sensing" it has capsized, but what type of mechanism would "right" the hull-?

kenish
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Unmanned vehicles a natural for risky missions
kenish   4/18/2012 11:14:15 AM
NO RATINGS
This could be an effective solution to pirates off the coast of Somalia.

DB_Wilson
User Rank
Gold
Re: Ability to "right itself" from capsized condition
DB_Wilson   4/18/2012 10:13:02 AM
NO RATINGS
The Coast Guard has had some self-righting boats for several years.  The 47 foot motor life boats have been in service since 1997.  This boat self-rights in 15 seconds with all equipment fully functional.  The new 45 foot medium response boat that began entering service in 2008 is self-righting but is not designed for conditions as severe as the motor life boat.

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Unmanned vehicles a natural for risky missions
warren@fourward.com   4/18/2012 7:49:09 AM
NO RATINGS
I wonder how many other areas this concept could be used in, Beth.  So far there is the Air Force and UAVs, the Navy and water-based UOVs (unmanned ocean vehicles), nuclear remote robots, and mine-detecting/mine destroying robots.  There must be unlimited opportunities for the next Steve Jobs who will find the next application.  I hope I'm him...

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