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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: where are the joints
Ann R. Thryft   4/11/2012 1:02:29 PM
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naperlou, the research has only just begun, so you're right that no one is doing this yet. The photos show prototypes, no doubt the ones shown to the NSF. The fact of who is involved also piqued my interest: the concentrated brainpower here is quite high, and many of the people involved have already done some pretty amazing things in robotics.


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Focus on Research
Ann R. Thryft   4/11/2012 1:01:49 PM
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I agree with your skepticism to some extent, Al and Beth. By looking at the background data, it appears that the researchers have used the words "design and customize" to really mean "customize" on a couple of different levels. What intrigued me about this, aside from the robot angle, is that it's quite in line with other developments Beth has written about regarding the use of blueprints by consumers to 3D print household items. This just takes that a couple steps farther with slightly more complex machines.


naperlou
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where are the joints
naperlou   4/11/2012 9:13:38 AM
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Ann, from the pictures I can see that this is a primitive device.  Where are the joints?  This will not have the mobility that is discussed. 

What I really don't understand is the use of the term "democratize".  To do what these researchers talk about you could certianly use a wheeled vehicle to better effect.  What is the NSF doing funding this?  If you could make really useful robots from just a specification language and a 3-D printer then people would be doing it. 

 

apresher
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Focus on Research
apresher   4/11/2012 8:55:25 AM
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Beth, I agree with you on the commercialization aspects of this project. Many of us would support NSF funding for research activities but the focus on "developing a desktop technology that lets the average person design, customize, and print a specialized robot in a few hours" is curious. Certainly the average person isn't going to produce results in terms of research funding, but I assume the project has primarily been funded on its merits as significant research.

Beth Stackpole
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Not just form, but function
Beth Stackpole   4/11/2012 6:41:13 AM
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Very cool initiative, but I have to wonder about the complexity of creating a 3D printer that is capable of allowing the average consumer to actually produce something that is so complex is terms of functional behaviors, not just physical form. It's one thing for a 3D printer to effortlessly crank out a screw or a bolt or some other physical piece of hardware that can fix a household appliance, but doesn't perform any movement. It's quite another to 3D print an entire robot that has motion to unscrew a jar or open a door.

No doubt it's possible in a research lab; I'm just wondering about the realities of commercialization on a grander scale.

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