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Rob Spiegel
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Re: The good old days
Rob Spiegel   4/11/2012 12:49:32 PM
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Yes, Nancy, my kids are the same way. After three years, the product has so many new features, the old product has little value. Pretty clever of the electronics industry to create early obsolescence.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Aaaaaaaaaaah! The Good OL' Days!
Ann R. Thryft   4/11/2012 12:44:51 PM
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kenish, your description reminds me of a toaster oven, don't remember the brand, that lasted about 20 years. Those were the days!


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Waiting for bread to toast
Ann R. Thryft   4/11/2012 12:43:27 PM
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cvandewater, I'm sure that toaster designs could vary, but also note that Dangela's comment below described fixing the toaster "to hold the bread down so it would toast", implying that more than just triggering is required.


naperlou
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A good laugh
naperlou   4/11/2012 10:26:41 AM
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Robert, I just had to comment.  I read your first paragraph and I just had to laugh.  It was great.  I was visualizing you tilting the toaster to get it to work.  My wife would have been telling me to get rid of the thing (and she's and engineer).

Rob Spiegel
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Re: The good old days
Rob Spiegel   4/11/2012 8:06:56 AM
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Interesting, Jhankwitz. I wonder how many engineers are now in the position to focus 100% on component longevirty. Maybe a few in defense, aerospace, and medical devices. Maybe some in Detroit as well.

Nancy Golden
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Re: The good old days
Nancy Golden   4/10/2012 8:02:27 PM
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Those were indeed the good old days. My kids just can't understand why I get aggravated when an electronic product or an appliance doesn't last longer than three years - they have grown up in a disposable society and its hard for them to comprehend something built with longevity in mind - anything older than three years is "old" to them and should be replaced anyway...

DScott
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Re: The good old days
DScott   4/10/2012 6:24:11 PM
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Thanks for your good work! I use a Sunbeam Radiant Toaster, a CoffeeMaster vacuum coffee maker, an Oster Snowflake ice crusher and a blender of a similar age. I know people who regularly use Mixmasters.

I push these thrift store finds on my friends who are amazed that at one time appliances were made to be serviced and last several lifetimes. The quality of the industrial design still impresses me. Anyone who considers classic cars worth collecting should also look into classic appliances.

You might look at the "automatic beyond belief" or the other vintage appliance websites. A real engineer from the Chicago Flexible Shaft Company would be valued source of information.

Zippy
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Re: User Manual?
Zippy   4/10/2012 5:16:25 PM
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It appears this article was placed in the wrong blog; it seems to belong in "Made by geniuses but intended to be sold to monkeys..."   :)

jhankwitz
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Re: The good old days
jhankwitz   4/10/2012 4:17:40 PM
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Ah, the years have been far kinder to those products than to my memory.  I don't recall any maintenance instructions included with any products other than the routine oiling of professional hair clipper bearings.  Truth is, my focus was 100% on component longevity, not product manuals.  Those were created by other Engineering teams and graphic artists.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: The good old days
Rob Spiegel   4/10/2012 3:51:47 PM
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So, the question of the day, Jhankwitz, is whether the Sunbeam was sold with a manual that explained the adjustment screw at the bottom of the toaster. I can understand Robert not having the instructions, since he bought the toaster as a resale shop. But what about new owners? Did Sunbeam alert them?

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