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Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A little leery
Dave Palmer   4/3/2012 4:58:37 PM
NO RATINGS
@sensorpro: Aluminum is being produced in the U.S., and scientists in the U.S. are working on developing lighter and stronger aluminum alloys.  In fact, Chinese scientists in the U.S. are working on developing lighter and stronger aluminum alloys.  Particularly when it comes to research, I don't think innovation in one country is an impediment to innovation in another country.  It's not a zero-sum game.

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: A little leery
sensor pro   4/3/2012 3:20:20 PM
NO RATINGS
In my opinion your statement is very purist. It is nice and dandy to have partners in other parts of the world, however do not forget who these partners are. Not all are our friends in heart. With all the problems of Chinese stealing secrets from numerous coutries, serious drive to increase and make stronger their military, air force and navy, does california really need to buy steel from them. Can't we find scientists in US to work on lighter and more durable Aluminum. Don't we have refinaries that can produce it?!

We need to stop looking for fast savings by moving abroad, and should start supporting our own industries.Not always the basic commercial interest should take over the decision process.

I do feel that we are loosing our knowhow and industrial power to other countries, and it is not smart.

 

 

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A little leery
Dave Palmer   4/3/2012 3:08:59 PM
NO RATINGS
The world doesn't revolve around the United States.  China is a huge and growing market, and aerospace companies would be foolish to ignore it.  There is also a tremendous amount of talent in Chinese universities and research institutions, not to mention money for research.  Boeing and Bombardier are engaging in these partnerships because they clearly think it is in their commercial interest to do so.

A lot of people seem to be saying that the Chinese only know how to copy, not how to innovate; that the quality of Chinese products is always inferior; that the Chinese are avaricious and can't be trusted, etc.

Besides being completely unfair generalizations, these are also the same things which people in Britain and Germany said about the U.S. in the 1800s.

Research into how to make commercial aircraft more fuel efficient, develop improved lightweight aluminum alloys, etc. is a good thing, no matter what country it takes place in.

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: A little leery
sensor pro   4/3/2012 2:00:10 PM
NO RATINGS
This is unreal. why to go to China and give out our secrets, while we have millions of unemployed ready to work. This is a win-win. Stay here and use our people and keep technology local.

What are they thinking !!!

wheely
User Rank
Silver
Boeing in China?
wheely   4/3/2012 11:36:28 AM
NO RATINGS
 Come on Boeing, didn't you learn anything from the outsourcing during 787 production. Every product I've seen or heard of being sent to Mexico or China is inferior.

 WOW, looks like Boeing needs new management again.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A little leery
TJ McDermott   4/3/2012 9:52:26 AM
NO RATINGS
The keys were already given away.  Substantial portions of the 787 wing are made in Japan and Korea.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
A little leery
tekochip   4/3/2012 9:26:51 AM
NO RATINGS
I have to admit that I'm also a little leery of sharing technology with a government and society that has such a horrible history of ignoring intellectual property and copyright laws. Both consumer and semiconductor sectors are flooded with pirated goods and I shudder to think that these same companies will be manufacturing aircraft and avionics with the blessing of Boeing. This is one of the few industries where the US still has a strong presence, and I hate to think that we would give away the keys to the kingdom for a little instant profit.


Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: China spreads its wings
Ann R. Thryft   4/3/2012 9:13:27 AM
NO RATINGS

Beth, I'm completely with you on this and have the same concerns. I've often heard it said that China can manufacture really good quality products or really low-quality products, depending on what they are asked to do and how much they are paid. That's true in general of contract manufacturing. However, for things like airplanes and baby's formula I think there's a lot of cause for concern with how strictly, and consistently, quality standards are enforced.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: China spreads its wings
Beth Stackpole   4/3/2012 9:00:45 AM
NO RATINGS
Cheaper source of manufacturing, maybe, but what about quality issues. Given the track record regarding poor quality for simple things like children's toys and food products, I'm not so sure I'd want to get on an aircraft produced in a factory that isn't governed by the same viligent standards that the U.S. and other countries uphold.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: China spreads its wings
Ann R. Thryft   4/3/2012 8:56:51 AM
NO RATINGS

I agree with you TJ, China's dismal record on IP rights makes all this sound like it may be good for Boeing in the short term and not so good for the US in the long term, whether this becomes a new source of cheaper aircraft for Boeing or not.


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