HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 3/3
cvandewater
User Rank
Gold
Re: Homemade version of what's already built.
cvandewater   3/29/2012 2:19:32 PM
NO RATINGS
I was just giving an example of a CFL that turns on instantly. Your article did not specify the unusually high light levels that you required and that this was the reason to select specific CFL, which apparently start slow. What kind of work is done in your shop that requires such high light levels?

DickB
User Rank
Iron
Re: Homemade version of what's already built.
DickB   3/29/2012 2:14:58 PM
NO RATINGS
I don't see how the Quartz Restrike would work for me.  That device is triggered by current draw; mine is triggered by ambient light.

DickB
User Rank
Iron
Re: Homemade version of what's already built.
DickB   3/29/2012 2:13:49 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm sure that there are other solutions.  I needed floodlights of 1000 lumens or more and total wattage of 200 or less.  There aren't many CFLs available in that category.  I suppose there may be some that brighten faster.

 

GE actually makes a hybrid lamp with a halogen bulb in the center of a CFL that works much like this.  But not in a floodlamp configuration, and they are more costly.  

cvandewater
User Rank
Gold
Re: Homemade version of what's already built.
cvandewater   3/29/2012 10:44:57 AM
NO RATINGS
How about testing a few CFLs until you find the ones that turn on instantly?

I have seen s-l-o-w starting CFLs and I have seen fluorescents with electronic controllers that start full brightness immediately when turned on. I even have one as a flashlight / emergency light that sits plugged into AC and the same moment that the grid power goes out (which is too often here) the light comes on full brightness. The lamp has no marking but it is a folded CFL tube of an estimated 10-15W, so very bright floodlight, operated from a built-in 6V sealed lead-acid battery by a small inverter board that also keeps the battery charged.

I have always converted every house I moved into since the CFLs became popular to as much CFL-only as possible and saved tons of money on power bills, even including the initial purchase of the lamps. I started to add some LED into the mix since a year, but still find too many failures from cheap Chinese manufacturing and bad design.

Not saying that this gadget is not useful, but it feels a bit like a kludge - an unnecessary complicated solution. But maybe this was simpler than buying new / the right type CLF, I don't know.

kleetus
User Rank
Silver
Homemade version of what's already built.
kleetus   3/29/2012 9:51:11 AM
NO RATINGS
Good to see someone sat down to build one, but this already exists... It's called a Quartz restrike, and is used where you need light when you have metal halide or other arc discharge lamps that may go out due to frequent poewr fluctuations.

For the case of the homeowner though, wouldn't it just be cheaper to just use the incandescent and turn it down?

williamlweaver
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Creative solution to inadequate lighting
williamlweaver   3/29/2012 7:36:35 AM
NO RATINGS
Wow, @Dick, that is really nifty! We have CFLs in the restrooms of our new science building. They are on a motion-sensor switch / timer that energizes them on entry. Not that you need lots of light for detailed work, but the room does take around 40 seconds to turn from an eerie yellow to solar white. The biggest problem is that the motion sensor cannot see down into the stalls...  so if you bring along reading material, you only have about 3 minutes before you have to use your cell phone as a flashlight. -- but I guess that is another problem all together. Nice work!  =]

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Creative solution to inadequate lighting
Beth Stackpole   3/29/2012 6:49:07 AM
NO RATINGS
Having just moved into a new house that is "challenged" in terms of adequate outlets/lighting, I can totally empathize with his situation and could use some of that creativity in my new home, albeit with a slightly sleeker, and less obtrusive asthetic design (no offense, Dick).

<<  <  Page 3/3


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service