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William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Liquid cooled LED lights.
William K.   3/28/2012 10:05:49 PM
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Fluid or liquid cooled lights would definitely have a future in crash test research where we need lots of light for high speed photogaphy, film or video. At a thousand frames a second lots of light is needed. Also for large screen projection systems, which may become common for room decoration and illumination, if the price continues to fall. 

Also, how about using them for headlights? Spotlights for a maritime environment could certainly use a lower current source of light, and they could happily live with some kinds of cooling systems.

So this is an interesting development indeed.

Matt G.
User Rank
Iron
Re: Bring on the LEDs
Matt G.   3/28/2012 11:46:55 AM
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We use mercury vapor lamps for UV curing of our products and the heat output of the lamps is enough that we must use 5 Tons of HVAC to cool them while in the curing chamber for only 15 seconds or so.  We would love to see UV LEDs that could cure without heating the product.  This development may be a boon for UV Curing of products that cannot take the heat of present UV lamps.  It is not the visible light that is most intriguing to us but the UV.

Flogge
User Rank
Silver
Industrial-scientific needs
Flogge   3/28/2012 9:48:49 AM
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I don't think this technology really applies to simple home lighting or even high-intensity shop lighting.  The light production efficiency is not any greater than more dispersed LED lighting with conventional cooling.  The manufacturing methods described would be very expensive to manufacture in comparison to the light output.  I could see this as a high-performance projector bulb, but as the article stated, the main focus is for industrial UV curing or other processes that require an incredibly intense light output. 

The cooling block may be used for other heat dissipation purposes.  High performance microchip cooling, laser components, etc.

 

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Liquid Coolant Selection
Greg M. Jung   3/28/2012 9:25:30 AM
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As the development of this technology continues, I wonder if the water coolant will also be replaced by another type of coolant in order to achieve even further advancements.

PPihkala
User Rank
Iron
Great for LEDs, great for Chips too?
PPihkala   3/27/2012 10:29:45 PM
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I think this cooler could be used to keep computer processors cool too. Just bond it on top of the processor and then the 100-200W used should be no problem.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Existing heat sinks?
Charles Murray   3/27/2012 6:44:28 PM
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How does this heat sink technology differ from the many types of existing LED heat sink technologies?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Ceramics to the rescue again
Ann R. Thryft   3/27/2012 1:09:00 PM
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Interesting that good old ceramics once again save the day, in a cooling sort of way. Ceramics have been used for decades to help cool all kinds of chips in IC packages of various kinds. Every time they are supposedly on the way out, a new app comes along that needs what they have to offer.


williamlweaver
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Bring on the LEDs
williamlweaver   3/27/2012 11:48:54 AM
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@bdcst You have summed up my thoughts exactly! In addition to using the waste heat for air or water, what about a fiber-optic light distribution system? The intensity of 30 headlights would go a long way to providing the illumination needs of an entire house. When the house is completely vacant, there would only be one, central light source to turn off. And with that many lumens, it's conceivable that back-lit display devices could also pipe into the central source. Oh the possibilities...  =]

bdcst
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Bring on the LEDs
bdcst   3/27/2012 11:30:37 AM
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Actually this might work for home lighting too.  Use the intense beam for indirect lighting bounced from a ceiling or diffuser.  Pipe the cooling loop through a home's heating system in winter to make use of the waste heat or in summer to help heat domestic hot water.

williamlweaver
User Rank
Platinum
Bring on the LEDs
williamlweaver   3/27/2012 6:52:46 AM
NO RATINGS
Wow. This is fantastic. We don't need the equivalent of 30 headlights for home lighting, but I don't think the integration of LED lighting into consumer products can happen soon enough. The use of Aluminum Nitride as the magic element bodes well in the face of reported global rare-earth shortages. Applications that do require this light intensity will need supplied liquid-coolant, but needs for cooling systems will be a great source of additional high-skills employment.



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