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tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
A little dab will do ya
tekochip   3/29/2012 7:38:23 PM
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Rob, I've used Super Glue, too. I once had a horrible knife wound in the palm of my hand (don't try to catch sharp knives when you drop them, those suckers will slip right through your hand.....IIIIEEEW) and with just a little dab I had my hand back together. It's not a recommendation, it's just an experience I had.


Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pain-free removal?
Mydesign   3/28/2012 5:24:07 AM
Moha, thanks for your valid input. I think most of us may come across such adhesive problems with bandage or cotton over the wound. Even I had struggled many times for removing these adhesive materials from skin and wound. Next time I will let you know whether it's effective or not.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pain-free removal?
Ann R. Thryft   3/27/2012 3:52:09 PM
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moha, thanks for your input. Using alcohol to remove adhesives from intact, uninjured skin definitely works. But your pain threshold must be a lot higher than mine: I would not put salt water anywhere near a wound. Also, there are coating cotton bandage materials with a slicker surface that are less likely to stick to a wound.

 

 

moha
User Rank
Iron
Re: Pain-free removal?
moha   3/27/2012 2:23:20 PM
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A simple way to remove adhesive bandages painlessly, is to apply alcohol to the edge of the bandage with a cotton swab. The alchol will release the adhesive, and the bandage can be pulled away from the skin as you wipe the swab back and forth at the skin/bandage interface.  If the cotton pad on the bandage has absorbed body fluid and is now stuck to the wound, salt water applied to the pad with an eye dropper will shortly soften the matrix holding the pad to the wound.

 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pain-free removal?
Ann R. Thryft   3/27/2012 1:03:49 PM
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Since this material is sold to hospitals, not to individuals, I'd bet it costs a lot more than Band-Aids, Chuck. But maybe we'll eventually see a lower-grade version for consumers some day.


ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
???
ChasChas   3/27/2012 11:28:10 AM
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And I was under the impression that the band-aid was already invented. Looks like they have came a long way from mere "blood stoppers".

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pain-free removal?
Charles Murray   3/26/2012 7:48:59 PM
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Nice story, Ann. Would it be cost-competitive with Band-Aids on everyday wounds?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pain-free removal?
Ann R. Thryft   3/26/2012 1:36:33 PM
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Thanks for your input everyone. This material is designed for fragile skin undergoing major trauma: skin that is continually abraded by colostomy bag tubes, or open wounds, sometimes chronic ones, or skin that has recently been cut in surgery, for example. So not only does it stick easily, but it also removes easily. I'm sure it would work on more everyday minor wounds and cuts, although probably not on dental bridges.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pain-free removal?
Rob Spiegel   3/26/2012 12:25:47 PM
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This is a great idea. I won't have to use Super Glue on my kids' cuts any longer. In my lifetime there has only been one advance in home-based cut care -- Super Glue. It's good to see an advance that isn't as weird as Super Glue. Now if only they could come up with a home-based solution to putting a dental bridge back in place. My dentist doesn't recommend Super Glue, though she did say some of her patients have tried it.

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Re: Pain-free removal?
ervin0072002   3/26/2012 9:51:17 AM
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Current Adhesive coverings for wounds cause major skin damage. My mom had some used on her in an operation she had. She had major skin lacerations 4 in by 6 in on either side of the operation. Because she had moved (minor moves) there were small cuts where the skin had torn in 1mm thin stripes alone the supporting strings in the strip of adhesive. It was painful for her and horrible image for the rest of us. Even with that risk supposedly wounds heal faster with adhesive strips supporting the wound.

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