HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Dirt?
Jack Rupert, PE   3/21/2012 9:01:05 PM
NO RATINGS
I wonder how that works after a few months of road grease...or a layer of ice or snow.

Also, I haven't seen the new Escape yet, but I hope they didn't get rid of the back back windwo that opens in addition to the whole tailgate.  That previous design is great for hanging something (like a 2x4) out and having an angle on it to keep it inside.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Dirt?
Charles Murray   3/26/2012 8:13:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Jack: You raise a good question. I never asked about the effect of ice and snow, but I assume it's not as big an issue as it would be if this were optical. I'll see if we can contact Ford and get an answer to your question.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Human Factors
Greg M. Jung   3/27/2012 10:08:48 PM
NO RATINGS
From a human factors standpoint, I wonder if the sensors will or will not work when a young person or even a small child kicks their foot under the bumper.  Can the sensor system distinguish size of leg and will there be any unintended effects if the system is inadvertently actuated (i.e. Johnny kicks his leg under the bumper and mom's head gets bumped by the liftgate closing down).

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Human Factors
Charles Murray   3/29/2012 9:55:20 PM
NO RATINGS
I don't think it can distinguish between a big and little leg, Greg. But the door won't open unless you've got the key fob in your pocket or close by. I suppose if Little Johnny is standing next to his Mom (who has the key), though, he could open the door.

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Waste of Technology
Tool_maker   4/2/2012 12:53:59 PM
NO RATINGS
If there was ever a solution in search of a problem, this is it. I have driven SUVs with tail gates since 1977 and can never remember this being a problem. However I can visualize hanging my head and upper torso in to get something and inadvertently actuating the mechanism.

 There is also a scenario where you park, walk away to the front with your back to the vehicle and someone familiar with the feature activates the device while you and your key are still in triggering distance. Also notice that the shopping bags used in the demo have handles. Two bags in one hand would solve the issue. Not to mention someone balancing on one foot in the snow and ice in which our driver does not want to set his bags, while kicking a foot under the vehicle. Anyone want to place bets on how long before Ford is sued for Grandma's broken hip?

  I think technology is really cool, but this appears to be just plain silly.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Waste of Technology
Rob Spiegel   4/2/2012 2:12:02 PM
NO RATINGS
I guess you're probably right, Tool Maker. This probably came from one of those sessions where everyone is sitting around trying to come up with new features and someone says, "Hay, I got an idea. . ." There is one solution disucssed in an earlier article -- cameras at the back of the vehicle that can see if there is a kid behine a car:

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1366&doc_id=239972

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Waste of Technology
Charles Murray   4/10/2012 8:20:29 PM
NO RATINGS
You might be right, Tool_maker. It might be a solution search of a problem and it might be a complete dud. But there are so many seemingly-unnecessary automotive features that have taken off that it's hard to completely rule out any feature. When power windows came out, many people laughed, saying they were perfectly capable of rolling the windows up and down without help. Same for power doorlocks and remote keyless entry ("you mean I need help putting my key in the door??"). Admittedly, I'm a terrible judge of these things (I never got power windows or remote keyless entry until they were thrust upon me), but ithis seems as viable as a lot of other silly features to me.  



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service