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Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Automobile Information Network
Charles Murray   3/22/2012 6:42:53 PM
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I must say I like your "keep it simple" philosophy, VadimR, but we're going to lose that battle. Every time I attend an auto show, there's a handful of new sensor-based systems that I'd never seen before.

Zippy
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Platinum
Re: Automobile Information Network
Zippy   3/22/2012 12:43:41 PM
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From this video, you would be hard-pressed to accidently trigger the gate:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DLKTO03Q7o

The rate of movement of the gate is also pretty leisurely.

Nevertheless, just when you build something that's idiot-proof, they build better idiots!    :)

VadimR
User Rank
Gold
Re: Automobile Information Network
VadimR   3/22/2012 9:30:38 AM
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If you want the feature, why not put a kick plate on the back of the bumper or a switch next to the tow hitch?  In both cases there is no need to verifying intent because you must be intentional to press the switch.

I personally think that we have way too many sensors and gadgets in cars.  Lets keep it simple!  The more complicated we make them, the more expensive cars become, the more likely they are to fail, and the more expensive they are to fix when they do fail.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Automobile Information Network
Charles Murray   3/21/2012 9:27:21 PM
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You're right, Bill. There's now about 70 pounds of signal and power wire inside the average vehicle. Something's gotta change.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Sensing security
Charles Murray   3/21/2012 9:18:51 PM
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It's just a quick kick, Tim. Hopefully, we will soon have a video up here to show how it's done.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Sensing security
Tim   3/21/2012 6:43:41 PM
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This is a great use of sensing techology to make something hands free and more user friendly.  I would like to know how long it is necessary to keep your foot under the bumper to have the tailgate completely rise.  Hopefully, you would be able to trigger the movement then be able to back up to stay out of the way of the lifting hatch. 

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Automobile Information Network
TJ McDermott   3/21/2012 6:42:26 PM
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Ever been stopped just as you were going to load your car?  A neighbor calls your name, and you turn to see why, or your spouse calls from the front door to add to your shopping list?  I can see this door giving you a whack from accidental detection, the "intent" described in the article.

Still, I like the idea very much; the cost added to the power package will be my deciding factor.

Mr. Weaver's comment about an onboard network is bang-on as well, though I don't think it will go to fiber optic.  Bussed sensors (Devicenet or the like) already exist; getting them down in cost should work for mass auto production.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Automobile Information Network
Rob Spiegel   3/21/2012 1:54:39 PM
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Yes, this is a very clever idea. It will be interesting to see if it is useful enough to get picked up by the industry at large. Not sure this rises to the level of intermittent windshield wipers, but who knows?

williamlweaver
User Rank
Platinum
Automobile Information Network
williamlweaver   3/21/2012 7:35:50 AM
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I know DesignNews continues to cover automobile data networks, but it is innovations like this liftgate sensor that makes them all the more imperative. As automotive engineers continue to instrument each sub-system on the platform, a common, multiplexed information network will be imperative as we continue. Yards of low-gauge automotive signal and power wire will only serve to increase cost and complexity. Can an on-board, distributed fiber-optic network be far behind?

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