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AdamAllevato
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Iron
Materials
AdamAllevato   3/16/2012 4:54:55 PM
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Hello everyone,

Thanks for showing interest in our project. Although it appears that the palm of the hand is made of metal, it is in fact the 3D-printed ABS that has been painted silver. We wanted to show that if this was a production device, the hand would most likely be made of metal and molded plastic, instead of rapid-prototyped material. Even the pins holding the finger joints together were made from plastic, but again, in the final product metal would probably be utilized.

Our team leader modeled the parts of the hand using Creo (Pro/ENGINEER) and exported to STL files for the printing. The printer filled the inside of the parts with a honeycomb-like structure. I was not the manufacturing lead on the project so I can't speak any more on the printing process, but I've asked our leader (who did the manufacturing) to come and comment regarding the printing.

The main reason that we chose to use rapid prototyping was because of the flexibility and speed it offered. We were able to make complex internal shapes (particularly the paths that the tension wires took through the palm) and were able to go through 4 design revisions within the course of 12 weeks or so. The speed was crucial because there was not much documentation available on how to design a robot like the one we were trying to build.

Adam

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: What are the materials?
Ann R. Thryft   3/16/2012 2:24:26 PM
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Thanks, Rob, for that info. How cool that Beth was right and it does use 3D printing. I'm also intrigued by the mix of materials among metals, rubber and whatever films are used for flex sensors these days. From the photo, it looked like a mix of metals and plastics of some kind. It will be interesting to see what else Adam has to say. 


Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: What are the materials?
Rob Spiegel   3/16/2012 2:15:26 PM
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Ann, you and Beth both have good questions about this gadget. Adam should respond to your questions when he gets a break in his school schedule today.

 

You can get a taste for some of the materials in the bill of materials and the build instructions:

http://downloads.deusm.com/designnews/03062012_buildinstructions.pdf

It is impressive that they used 3D printing.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
What are the materials?
Ann R. Thryft   3/16/2012 12:50:13 PM
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This is a great invention, and one that is a good example of what robotics are so good at: whatever we humans can't do, either because we'd not survive the environment, or sending us there is too costly (e.g., outer space), for example. Like Beth, I'd love to know more about the materials.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Robotics in the palm of your hand
Beth Stackpole   3/16/2012 7:07:25 AM
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This is very cool and a good candidate for lots of different applications. And I'm curious about the rapid prototyping angle. Any intel on what systems/materials they used to produce the glove and why they choose the 3D printing route?

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