HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Great Series
Jack Rupert, PE   3/17/2012 6:47:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for a very interesting refresher article.  I hope to see more of these in the future.  It's amazing what one tends to forget when it is not being used everyday.

Jon Titus
User Rank
Blogger
Re: calculation of LSB step size
Jon Titus   3/16/2012 10:39:15 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Paul, and I requested this correction a few weeks ago when another reader noted the incorrect units.  Sometimes symbols don't translate well from a Word document to the HTML.  I'll ask again--thanks for your reminder.

Paul-stl
User Rank
Iron
calculation of LSB step size
Paul-stl   3/16/2012 9:47:14 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
In your calculation of the LSB step size, you state that 10e-3 V /16383 steps = 0.610V.  Shouldn't this be 0.610 microVolts?

N. Christopher Perry
User Rank
Gold
Re: More good information.
N. Christopher Perry   3/8/2012 5:20:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Ouch....  Did you track down the offending party and box their ears?

Jon Titus
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More good information.
Jon Titus   3/8/2012 5:06:53 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi, Christopher.  You make a good point about sensor ranges, so I'll put it on my topic list for a column after I wrap up this series on data-acquisition.  You remind me that it's always good to start on a high range with an instrument and then change to a lower scale as appropriate. I once saw a bent needle on a Simpson VOM someone used to measure line power with a low-voltage setting. It almost made me cry.

N. Christopher Perry
User Rank
Gold
More good information.
N. Christopher Perry   3/8/2012 4:34:38 PM
NO RATINGS
Glad to see you presenting this.  I've often had to point this out to my junior engineers; now I can point them to this article.

On a parallel subject.  Are you going to discuss selecting sensor ranges relative to the measured value in question?  I've also encounter situations where the engineer selected something like a 0-100 psi pressure transducer to measure a varying pressure with a mean around 80 psi and then just assumed the occasional 100 psi spikes where as high as the signal got....  I was trained to select a sensor which put the nominal reading at ~50% of the sensor range if I was fairly sure of what I was measuring, and to use less of the range if there was more uncertainty in the measured quantity.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Great Information!
Nancy Golden   3/7/2012 5:07:21 PM
NO RATINGS

Very nice solution for utilizing the entire range available and increasing the apparent resolution – with a very cost effective and easy to implement solution. Thanks for another great article!

Jon Titus
User Rank
Blogger
Thank you
Jon Titus   3/7/2012 3:26:10 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for your kind words.  The third installment covers anti-aliasing filters and it should go live in a week or so.  Stay tuned. 

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Adding to the toolbox
TJ McDermott   3/6/2012 8:47:25 PM
NO RATINGS
I share naperlou's statement; I'm going to add this series to my library.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Gain
naperlou   3/6/2012 10:48:56 AM
NO RATINGS
Jon, good article.  This is a very useful bit of informaiton for deigners to have in their toolbox.



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Samsung's fitness-oriented smart watch features a curved super AMOLED touchscreen display.
Stratasys is buying assets of a key player in materials testing and R&D for its FDM filament printers, and there's a new polypropylene material for the PolyJet series of 3D printers.
Cybathlon is an Olympic-style competition for those with bionic prosthetics.
Unlike industrial robots, which suffered a slight overall slump in 2012, service robots continue to be increasingly in demand. The majority are used for defense, such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs); and agriculture, such as milking robots.
Eric Chesak created a sensor that can detect clouds, and it can also measure different sources of radiation.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service