HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/2
Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The cost of coatings
Alexander Wolfe   3/5/2012 7:21:05 PM
NO RATINGS
This is a great roundup, Ann. As from the considerable utility of the stuff you're writing about, your coverage is making this stuff interesting besides! Quite an achivement.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The cost of coatings
Charles Murray   3/5/2012 7:06:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Good job detailing all the reasons for use of coatings, Ann. In the coatings market, is there one application for coatings that stands out above the others, in terms of raw numbers? Would it be anti-corrosion? 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The cost of coatings
Ann R. Thryft   3/5/2012 2:24:55 PM
NO RATINGS

Dave, thanks for weighing in on coatings, especially the health issues in chromate conversion coatings. You've got valuable information since it comes from an independent testing lab instead of from the suppliers. Although the suppliers of course want to tout their own products, I was pleased to find that most of them could be objective about many technical and industry issues.


Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The cost of coatings
Dave Palmer   3/5/2012 1:38:44 PM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Ann, thanks for a whirlwind tour through the world of coatings.  You covered a tremendous amount of ground in this article.

We have been doing a lot of work on finding suitable alternatives to chromate conversion coatings for marine applications.  Chromate conversion coatings do a great job of inhibiting corrosion on aluminum.  Rather than sealing the aluminum off from the environment, the presence of the chromate ion actually alters the chemistry of the corrosion reaction, slowing it down significantly.  Chromate conversion coatings are self-healing, and provide a great base for paint.  Unfortunately, hexavalent chromium is also a potent carcinogen.  Because of this, there has been an industry-wide effort to phase it out.

We have had some good success using the Alodine EC² coating described in the article.  This coating has many excellent properties.  However, there are also a number of challenges which come from the fact that it is an electrodeposited coating.  Among other things, this makes it difficult to coat the inside of tight passages.  So, while EC² has many advantages, it is not necessarily a "silver bullet" for every application.

We are continuing to look at some of Henkel's other non-chromate coatings.  Among these is Alodine 5200.  Like EC², it is a titanium oxide coating, but unlike EC², it is not electrodeposited.  Unfortunately, our initial findings were that the Alodine 5200 did not have as much corrosion resistance as a chromate coating.

However, this testing was done using an epoxy primer.  Since doing this testing, I've seen some data which suggests that Alodine 5200 may perform better than chromate when an acetoacetate primer is used, rather than an epoxy.  This points to the fact that it's important to look at the entire coating system (substrate, coating, primer, and paint), rather than just one component in isolation.

Of course, besides the many chrome-free products which Henkel makes, there are also a number of chrome-free products on the market from other manufacturers, including Metalast, Macdermid, and many others.

Coatings and corrosion are complex topics, and I continue to try to educate myself about them.  Just about anyone who is actually an expert on coatings works for a coating supplier, so it can be hard to find an unbiased opinion.  It's important to build up enough general knowledge to be able to evaluate the suppliers' claims about their products.  And, of course, there's no substitute for doing your own testing.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Multifunction Coatings
Ann R. Thryft   3/5/2012 12:21:58 PM
NO RATINGS

Al, I think you bring up an important point about the multiple disciplines an engineer must master, especially relating to materials: coatings and paints, fasteners vs or plus adhesives, metal and/or plastic/composite materials for the box or body of the object and if mixing those body materials, what should go where? On a larger scale, much of this complexity and these interacting decisions reminds me of PCB design issues.


Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The cost of coatings
Ann R. Thryft   3/5/2012 12:17:54 PM
NO RATINGS

Beth, for many (if not most) of these harsh environment apps, coatings are not an afterthought or seen as an addition, but are considered an integral part of the product. As such, the time and cost involved of particular coatings are weighed just like the time and cost of other aspects of manufacturing the product. The question isn't usually to coat nor not to coat, but which type of coating to use and how many of them.


apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Multifunction Coatings
apresher   3/5/2012 8:26:02 AM
NO RATINGS
Ann, Exellent article.  One of the interesting things with advancing technology in almost every discipline is making the connection between innovations and applications.  It just makes sense that multifunction coatings will increase performance and reduce costs, as long as engineers are educated on what's possible. That's a significant problem for personnel asked to wear many hats.  Thanks.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
The cost of coatings
Beth Stackpole   3/5/2012 6:47:48 AM
NO RATINGS
As you very adeptly lay out in this piece, Ann, coatings are playing a much bigger role in product designs of all sorts for a variety of reasons--for durability, for environmental reasons, for performance. That said, I imagine they add significant cost to a design, not to mention, require additional time on the part of the engineer to properly research and figure out what type of coating best addresses their particular design challenge. Any thoughts on how engineers can mitigate these additional costs with better design choices or processes?

<<  <  Page 2/2


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Factory floor engineers may soon be able to operate machinery and monitor equipment status simply by tapping their eyeglasses.
GE Aviation not only plans to use 3D printing to mass-produce metal parts for its LEAP jet engine, but it's also developing a separate technology for 3D-printing metal parts used in its other engines.
In this TED presentation, Wayne Cotter, a computer engineer turned standup comic, explains why engineers are natural comedians.
IBM's new SyNAPSE chip makes it possible for computers to both memorize and compute simultaneously.
The “Space Kid,” 11, will be one of the first civilians to have his design manufactured in space by NASA, thanks to the City X Project, which inspires kids to think about new 3D-printed inventions that could be useful for humans living in space.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development – A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service