HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Page 1/2  >  >>
Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: ipad application: 3D instructions
Ann R. Thryft   3/6/2012 4:38:00 PM
NO RATINGS

What a great idea that will vastly improve instruction manuals, especially for fixing or changing large, complex machines like cars, and for assembly instructions of large and small machines. Thanks, Beth. 


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: ipad application: 3D instructions
Beth Stackpole   3/6/2012 7:39:05 AM
NO RATINGS
@WilliamK: While I have to agree poorly written product directions translated to another platform are just another set of poorly written product directions, I think we're missing the bigger picture here. The idea is substituting the poorly written text, which is often translated from foreign text and done horribly at best, with highly graphical visual elements, frequently animated instructions. Remember the saying, a picture is worth a thousands words. It might make things far clearer if you could see an exploded image of the parts, with animations that depict how things actually fit together.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
ipad application: 3D instructions
William K.   3/5/2012 9:09:08 PM
NO RATINGS
It may be harder to lose online instructions, but it would be a challnge to find them 2 or 3 years from now, even if they were saved on the ipad. Not to mention the number of times that I have accidentally dropped instructions. Dropping an ipad can be costly. 

I do agree that poorly written instructions are a large source of customer frustration, but it is not clear how poorly written 3d animated instructions will be any better. To the contrary, those instructions will be more expensive to correct, so revisions will probably not happen. There is no substitute for accuracy and completeness in instructions. 

Of course the "cool" factor will sella lot of products, but once again, slick production gimmicks are no substitute for being correct and complete. Of course, it is a nice way to provide "product differentiation" as a substitute for that more expensive "product quality" that is so very rare these days.

lgrant
User Rank
Bronze
Re: Partnering with technical world
lgrant   3/1/2012 1:05:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Lego is really on the ball about partnering with industry.  I think one masterful partnership is their one with CopaData.  CopaData offers a free "zenon Science Pack", which includes a version of their soft PLC and HMI/SCADA software that works with Lego Mindstorms NXT 2.0. 

So not only do people get to have a lot of fun controlling their Mindstorms projects, but they get to see the software in action, and work with it much more closely than one could in a class or demo, before deciding whether they want to use it to run their plants.

More details are here: http://www.copadata.com/index.php?id=1838

And no, I'm not shilling for CopaData.  I just thought this was such a brilliant partnership that I had to mention it.

Lynn

 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great instructions idea
Rob Spiegel   3/1/2012 10:30:32 AM
NO RATINGS
That makes sense, Beth. The iPad tie-in also makes sense, especially when it comes to the maintenance and repair of any system, factory or aircraft. The iPad is a portability improvement over the laptop. In plants, maintenance folks like the iPad because they don't have to balance it on their knee like a laptop when they're out looking at the line.

Gord.Davison
User Rank
Iron
Use 3D animation for assembly instructions
Gord.Davison   3/1/2012 9:56:09 AM
NO RATINGS

I can see a fantastic use for this as assembly instructions. I have had to read (and write) many assembly instructions both for home and work and trying to read a document that has been translated from German to Mandarin then to English, well you get the picture. If the assembly instructions are put on the web using visualization software that you could read with your iPad or any smart device then this would make assembly so much easier plus reduce the amount of translation required.

During assembly you could run the sequence then pause it any time while you catch up with the video then run it again. If there are options then you could interactively drag in those options and the sequence would be modified to suite. Also if you have pieces that need to be manipulated into place, perhaps ones that may have collisions with other parts one could do this on the screen to see how to orient them.

 

 I think it is a wonderful idea.

 


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Partnering with technical world
Beth Stackpole   3/1/2012 6:48:33 AM
NO RATINGS
It's a smart pairing. Grab the kids and get their parents at the same time. Also does a lot to expose future generations of scientists, builders, and engineers to the tools that will help them do their jobs.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Partnering with technical world
Charles Murray   2/29/2012 11:03:19 PM
NO RATINGS
It's interesting to see how Lego has partnered with the technical world. Lego has also partnered with National Instruments, using the LabView graphical programming langaue in its Mindstorms set.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Good for Lego
naperlou   2/29/2012 9:43:07 PM
NO RATINGS
I have also assembled Lego's for a long time with my kids.  Some of the bigger kits can be more challenging.  My sons and I have also used some of the robotics technology and some of the designer software.  This seems to be a big step forward from that.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Great instructions idea
Tim   2/29/2012 6:45:02 PM
NO RATINGS
If the instructions are on-line, you can not lose them. I would pay a premium for my next piece of composite furniture to have 3D documentation with a comprehensive parts list

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
During a teardown of the iPad Air and Microsoft Surface Pro 3 at the Medical Design & Manufacturing Show in Schaumburg, Ill., an engineer showed this "inflammatory" video about the dangers of maliciously mishandling lithium-ion batteries.
The Window Watcher stops the burglar before he does damage or enters the house. House alarm service companies set off alarms and call the service only after the burglar has damaged and entered the house.
If you’re designing a handheld device or industrial machine that will employ a user interface, then you’ll want to check out the upcoming Design News Continuing Education Center course, "Engineering Principles Behind Advanced User Interface Technologies.”
Brooke Williams of Texas Instruments explains how TI’s new TDA3x chip will help future vehicles “see” all around themselves.
It's been two years since the Mac Mini's last appearance on iFixit's teardown table, but a newly revised version joins Apple's lineup this week.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Nov 3 - 7, Engineering Principles behind Advanced User Interface Technologies
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service