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JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Pure V2V vs. GPS assist
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   2/29/2012 2:55:19 PM
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Existing technology of machine to machine, or M2M is commonplace today.  Expanding the concept to moving vehicles is logical and now even an obvious step in the right direction.  Start today, and within 10 years, all cars on the road will transmit and receive V2V signaling in various protocols.

However, the article further eludes that a GPS interface is also necessary.   I disagree, and think that while GPS is critical in providing LBS (location based services), the entire concept of V2V could be more streamlined in incorporating the right solutions without incurring the cost and complexities of GPS based LBS.  Think about it: would I want my vehicle to sense another oncoming vehicle with a readable signal;  or is it better to get the same result after routing the signaling thru the celestial constellation systems-?

Kevin Harper
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Iron
V2V Comms - info overload?
Kevin Harper   2/29/2012 12:37:20 PM
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Like with any technology it always sounds great at first.  Given the propensity of today's drivers to be distracted already with much more important tasks such as phone conversing, reading, texting, etc in the car, would MORE information make them pay attention?  Maybe if the system sent them a text message..."WARNING, Idiot driver in cross traffic at the upcoming intersetion is about to run a red light!"  Then the driver may pay attention!

brianc1969
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Iron
Re: Slow ramp to life savings benefits
brianc1969   2/29/2012 11:22:28 AM
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I sure hope designers are paying attention to security! I can see it  now, in the short term when the car only gives the driver warnings: Kids on the side of the road with a rogue transmitter telling passing cars the non-existent light ahead will be turning red... or later when the car makes decisions for you, the same scenario making the car stop!!

Then there are the criminal intents, the privacy issues (each car would be uniquely identifiable i'm sure), plus unintentional interference (or intentional jamming).

The way automotive electronics systems have been designed thus far isn't very comforting.

I'm not saying it should be abandoned, just that we need to make sure it is implemented correctly!

We'll have to install these transmitters on deer and other critters too, so when they cross roads, cars are aware!  :)

 

 

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Slow ramp to life savings benefits
Beth Stackpole   2/29/2012 6:53:33 AM
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Definitely a technology to keep on the radar screen. While I do think V2V Communications has life saving potential, as with any of these emerging technologies, there are questions about it, more in the short term, before it's fully evolved. One thing that occurs to me is say all these new vehicles are equipped with the sensing, receivers, and GPS technology to make this work, what about the older vehicles that don't have the requisite technology on board? All it takes is one of these to blow a stop sign and any driver in the cross path depending on his or her onboard warning system is toast.

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