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Beth Stackpole
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Re: What about the "back-end" -?
Beth Stackpole   2/29/2012 7:01:52 AM
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@Alex: I think your point about sterility related to 3D printed parts like this implant is not as acute given what we talked about before in that there is a long history of foreign implants used in orthopedics and other medical specialty areas. Thus, there is a process and best practices around ensuring these foreign substances are primed to live within the human body. The idea of 3D printing organs is a totally different animal, however. There, I think you raise some valid issues around challenges to come. My sense is we have a long way to go on that front.

Alexander Wolfe
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Re: What about the "back-end" -?
Alexander Wolfe   2/28/2012 4:26:27 PM
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This is a highly significant development, given the cases of necrotic jaw which have come to light, allegedly as a result of the use of Fosamax, a drug which was supposed to prevent osteoporosis but instead seems to have caused serious side effects. Thus is seems 3D printing will eventually join robotics and medical miniaturization (i.e., smaller data and diagnostic products) as new and valuable tools for doctors. My one question re 3D printed human parts are sterility and validation.

Jon Titus
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Re: LayerWise Examples
Jon Titus   2/28/2012 2:57:21 PM
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I wasn't sure whether that meant they had threads in the holes or that they would tap the holes later.  Inserts normally require a titanium fitting that threads into the bone, which them infiltrates into the insert and holds it fast.  Then a post threads into the insert.  In any case, this is amazing technology.

Beth Stackpole
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Re: LayerWise Examples
Beth Stackpole   2/28/2012 2:29:52 PM
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Jon: The information from Layerwise is that they did create the 3D printed jaw with provisions to accomodate some sort of dental fixture. See text: "Furthermore, the mandible implant is equipped to directly insert dental bar and/or bridge implant suprastructures at a later stage."



Jon Titus
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LayerWise Examples
Jon Titus   2/28/2012 1:39:59 PM
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The LayerWise site has many photos of parts manufactured with the same types of technologies used to create the jaw bone.  I thought the powdered-metal component might need sintering or annealing after construction in the 3-D printer, but it seems as though the laser actually fuses the metal particles and the printed part needs no additional processing. I'd like to see some photos that show the crystalline structure of the metal to see how the metal particles form a single piece.

I wondered if the LayerWise jaw included threaded holes for inserts to the patient could have implants to replace teeth.  Perhaps the threading took place in a separate step.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: What about the "back-end" -?
Rob Spiegel   2/28/2012 1:03:03 PM
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Medical technology developments will be self-sustaining as well. Unlike the space program, medical developments are aimed to solve specific physical problems (produce a jaw, grow a bladder). While some of the research may be state funded, the resulting technology will move into the marketplace. 

sensor pro
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Gold
Re: What about the "back-end" -?
sensor pro   2/28/2012 12:55:24 PM
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I agree with you. With so many engineers shifting from space/military to health, it is no wonder that health will be the growing field.

ChasChas
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Platinum
Re: What about the "back-end" -?
ChasChas   2/28/2012 12:08:24 PM
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It appears as though patients with nothing or very little to lose are volunteering for this kind of research. Unfortunately,  there seems to be very little shortage of people in such a position that all they want is another go at a higher quality of life.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: What about the "back-end" -?
Rob Spiegel   2/28/2012 11:38:36 AM
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@Beth. Medical advances look like they will the space program of the coming decades. I thinjk the oh-wow advances will be in health. That will put enormous pressure on state-funded medicine, and it will probably extend both quality of life and life expectancy.

Beth Stackpole
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Re: What about the "back-end" -?
Beth Stackpole   2/28/2012 6:41:09 AM
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@Rob,

When researching this, I found several articles about the future of 3D printing to "print" human organs and body parts, using organic materials to "grow" body parts like blood vessels and other organs. Obviously, that's just in the research stage and likely still years, if not decades, away, but it still a very promising technology for advancing medical care far into the future.

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