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Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Early attempts at RoHS compliance?
Ann R. Thryft   3/2/2012 11:54:49 AM
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Thanks for the reply. You may well be right. RoHS compliance in electronics is just about 5 or 6 years old now. I began writing about it a couple of years before that. The problems in finding solder replacements that were good enough and didn't require cooking the board at much higher temperatures than tin/lead--thus melting other materials or at least shortening their lifespans, as well as all kinds of differential CTE problems--were legendary. Re the health issues, I'm grateful we don't have lead water pipes out here. One of these days I'll be able to replace all our galvanized steel plumbing with copper.


Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Early attempts at RoHS compliance?
Rob Spiegel   3/2/2012 3:57:29 PM
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I didn't realize you covered RoHS, Ann. I did too. For a couple years before and after the RoHS deadline, I ran a Lead-Free Zone mini-website here at Design News. It was a hot site until the RoHS deadline came and went, at which point I shifted to covering REACH and all the different flavors of RoHS (China, Korea, California). Now it seems to be a fairly quiet subject.




Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Early attempts at RoHS compliance?
Ann R. Thryft   3/6/2012 1:02:58 PM
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My RoHS coverage was focused on what was happening on the PCB and how replacing various materials, most obviously lead solder materials, had various effects on production and performance. That coverage slowed down, as apparently yours did, when the problems started getting solved.


Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Early attempts at RoHS compliance?
Rob Spiegel   3/6/2012 1:23:32 PM
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I know there are still those out there who says the problem hasn't been solved. At this ploint, that doesn't seem to be a widely held position. Even so, when electronics fail, there is a number of people who yell, "Tin Whiskers." That voice rose up when Toyota was having its accelerator problems.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Early attempts at RoHS compliance?
Larry M   3/6/2012 4:15:20 PM
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Rob,

Whether or not you choose to deny it, the tin whiskers problem is real, as are the problems with brittle joints and components stressed by overheating during assembly. Many of the complaints we hear about and read in Design News relating to poor American design or Chinese manufacturing and the short life of electronics including appliances, cameras, cellphones, computers, and MP3 players are due to problems with solder.

I've repaired my son's dryer (brittle solder joints between the relay pins and the circuit board) and the remote control for my DVR (probably tin whiskers, as the problem was resolved by brushing the closely-spaced leads of all surface-mount components with a fine brass "toothbrush." Probably a half-dozen other such repairs too.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Early attempts at RoHS compliance?
Rob Spiegel   3/7/2012 2:37:38 PM
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Larry, you very well may be right. Yet I would think the problem would be even more widespread, enough for component manufacturers and brand owners to raise a stink about it. Yet none of them are saying much that I can see. The electronics industry seems pretty blasé about the subject these days.

 

BrusselsSprout
User Rank
Gold
2014 Update
BrusselsSprout   7/14/2014 12:18:53 PM
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I can tell you that the effected repairs have held up to date.  What had been a monthly/weekly cycle of problems continues to operate with no incidents.

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