HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/2
naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Software Engineering
naperlou   2/14/2012 9:23:44 AM
NO RATINGS
Beth, nice article, and very timely.  The first thing that comes to mind is that many organizations doing embedded design have hardware engineers doing software.  The reason for this is that most people think that anyone can write code.  I have seen it.  And yet, we have, as your story points out, more and more software content in products.  I get involved in judging senior projects at some local universities from time to time.  These are all in hardware disciplines.  In each case, there is a microprocessor invovled.  The main reason for this is the complexity of some of the projects.  There is simply not enough time to develop a hardware solution, even if they could get it built.  On the other hand, the students do not have a good background in software and point out that this was the most difficult part of their project.  The schools are attempting to remedy this.

My background is in the spacecraft industry.  The projects were large and complex and expensive.  We had a strong systems engineering group.  We also had functional teams with all the various disciplines.  There were several mechanical (mechanisms, stress, thermal, materials, etc.), electrical (power, logic, controls) and software engineering.  There were also manufacturing engineering functions and a large engineering support group (read drafting or CAD).  A project would draw people from each of the functonal groups. So, by design, we had the multidisciplinary teams.  This worked well.  We often used system design languages and made the decision of whether to implement in hardware or software well down in the process. 

In recent times, I have been more involved in the commercial embedded world (among other things).  I notice things coming into vogue such as requirements traceability, higher level languages (C++ for C) and OOP techniques.  These things are being supported by the CAD vendors and are being driven, I think, by the involvemen of the software engineers.

I think we will see a real shift in how these projects are done as these techniques are applied more widely. 

<<  <  Page 2/2


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Design collaboration now includes the entire value chain. From suppliers to customers, purchasing to outside experts, the collaborative design team includes internal and external groups. The design process now stretches across the globe in multiple software formats.
Researchers have developed a hybrid energy harvester for generating electricity from multiple spectrums of solar energy.
A new high-pressure injection-molding technology produces near-net shape parts with 2-inch-thick walls from high-performance materials like PEEK, PAI, and carbon-filled polymers. Parts show no voids, sinks, or porosity, have more consistent mechanical properties, and are stronger.
These futuristic military robots will help soldiers and other military personnel better perform their duties.
Icon Labs has developed a whitepaper to help determine the type of cybersecurity needed based on the type of device.
More:Blogs|News
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service