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BobGroh
User Rank
Platinum
Re:Apple blasted for tiny Torx screws
BobGroh   2/14/2012 10:41:03 AM
NO RATINGS
As is often the case, I am a bit on the fence here. On the one hand, I would like to point out that the screws may have been used for better assemblibility (hope that is a word) rather than as a 'anti-intrusion device'.  Phillips screws are ok for assembly but hardly the optimum for a high production rate environment.

On the other hand, I do hate to see special hardware used which makes it difficult for me to get into something. As an example, I have a Lionel model train controller which 'broke' (probably because a fuse blew inside the assembly). This is a little $90 box - too expensive to throw away, too inexpensive to get fixed.  Should be easy for a moderately competent engineer (I hope I fit in that category) to fix but .... guess what - they used some type of anti-tamper screws!!  Darn them! 

If I could find the particular screwdriver needed (I couldn't) it would have me $8 to $16.  A pretty steep price for a maybe fix. In this case, someone on the internet (thank goodness for the web!) said he had modified an old screwdriver to do the job. So I grabbed an old screw driver, eyeballed the screw head (buried inside the controller), ground and tried and ground and tried until I got them out.  And, no, they won't go back in!

Odd hardware can be very aggravating (or even the lack of hardware as in the sealed mouse casing).  But it probably makes sense from a production standpoint. Just makes us

 

ncourtney
User Rank
Silver
Re: Apple Blasted for Tiny Torx Screws
ncourtney   2/14/2012 10:30:15 AM
Really!?, I'm pretty sure when I or you buy anything it belongs to you or I, and not Apple, they don't repair it for free since it's not their property anymore once a consumer buy it, the consumer owns it an can do whatever they want to it.

I guess car manufacturers should do the same, but they don't because once a car is bought and leaves the lot it belongs to the person who bought the car, and yes you can purchase warranty repair so that Apple and others will fix "YOUR" phone, just like you can purchase a warranty repair for a "YOUR" car or you can work on "YOUR" car yourself and be responsible if it's repaired incorrectly.

Apple doesn't own "YOUR" phone once "YOU" buy it, now do they?

The only idiots are the ones who are seriously trying to say that a person can't open, tinker or repair something "THEY" bought and now own. Get real!

I guess when you buy a house you shouldn't tinker with anything in it, and the person or company that owned the home should be the only ones who do any repairs, but they won't because it's "YOUR" home and "YOU" the home owner are responsible for doing any repairs, which you can choose to do "YOURSELF" or pay some else to do them for  "YOU".

Why, because it's your property and you bought, if you lose it Apple isn't going to give another one for free unless "YOU" purchased insurance on the phone and even then depending on the carrier it may not be a  new phone, and "YOU" may have to pay a deductible first.

EricMJones
User Rank
Gold
Pentalobular screws....
EricMJones   2/14/2012 10:27:43 AM
Huh? Is this blog about not being able to find the right screw-driver? 

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Easy way to tell Apple what you think
TJ McDermott   2/14/2012 10:25:31 AM
If anti-tamper screws are that much of an issue, (or non-replaceable batteries for that matter), tell Apple exactly how you feel.

DON'T BUY THE PRODUCT.

There are competitive products to the I-Phone.  There is a price to be paid for the Apple interface.  If you must have it, you must also accept their anti-tamper methods.  Otherwise, shop elsewhere.

If enough people do this, you will effect a change.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Anti tamper or manufacturing necessity
Alexander Wolfe   2/14/2012 10:20:16 AM
I agree with the meme expressed here that if you're not smart enough to deal with these screws, you shouldn't be mucking around attempting repairs anyway. I don't think that was the point though in the original criticism of Apple. It's more that they have a culture of making things difficult.

rnelson50
User Rank
Iron
Screws ares old, but drivers rare
rnelson50   2/14/2012 10:02:22 AM
NO RATINGS
We all have pet peaves about Apple no doubt, but you probably can't blame the 5-pont screws on them.  The 60GB Toshiba drive in front of me now (from a crushed 2005 Apple iPod I should add) has 5-point screws and it's many years older than the iPhone 4s. Yes. Looks almost like a toque, but lacking 1 point -- and I don't have a driver either.  By the way, Amazon has a driver for 0.99.

kearneyp
User Rank
Iron
Re: Apple Blasted for Tiny Torx Screws
kearneyp   2/14/2012 9:45:31 AM
NO RATINGS
The 5 sided pentagon drive screws used in UK municipal playgrounds are exclusive to Wicksteed Leisure, and spare fixings and keys can be obtained from them. This is an anti-vandal safety measure and is not intended to give Wicksteed a monopoly on maintenance.

Jon Fuge
User Rank
Iron
Re: Apple Blasted for Tiny Torx Screws
Jon Fuge   2/14/2012 9:40:07 AM
As a dedicated "bodge artist"; I avoid Apple devices preferring more open sourced products. The issue comes in however when family or friends ask me to repair little Timmy, or Tina's iPlop. Although replacement components are readily available from many online sources it would be nice to not have a requirement of buying a new 5 sided torx for a one off repair; in my opinion, it's just unnecessary cost which only benefits the tool maker / seller.

JPW
User Rank
Silver
Free market
JPW   2/14/2012 9:39:49 AM
NO RATINGS
I concur with fatmanonabicycle. Love when people who trump "free" cry when someone or company "freely" tries to prevent others from easily diseminating their product.

In a free market you don't necessarily have to be mr. nice guy to everyone that wants to use your product in a "their" way. That's why there are many manufacturers of these devices; one company cannot, nor should, try to appease everyone. Nor should they be "forced" to have to create open products; if that's that important to you then you go make products anyone can take apart.

jhankwitz
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apple Blasted for Tiny Torx Screws
jhankwitz   2/14/2012 9:38:39 AM
Your exactly correct.  Only those savy enough to acquire a pentelobe screwdriver whould even begin to have enough smarts to understand what's going on inside their iDevice.  Apple needs to keep the idiots out of the product's guts.

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