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Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Ann R. Thryft   2/16/2012 12:48:12 PM
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Well, at least someone knows what I mean. Thanks, Rob! Maybe gardening helps. The company sells samples, although I don't know if they will send them to individuals. Here's the samples page:

http://www.ecovativedesign.com/store/


Tool_maker
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Platinum
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Tool_maker   2/16/2012 10:01:07 AM
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@Dave.  I am inclined to agree with you. Biological manipulation and introduction of hybrid species is great when they work, but we also have Asian carp, whatever that funky vine that is choking out vegetation down south and other examples of good intentions that have unintended bad consequences. I am in industrial mechanical devices, so have no standing in biologocal engineering, but it spooks the devil out of me

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Rob Spiegel   2/15/2012 3:34:35 PM
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I don't get the ick factor either. I too cook and garden. I think it's a very positive move. Yet some people have very strong feelings about any type of fungus. I'd like to see this new material.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Ann R. Thryft   2/15/2012 3:14:20 PM
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I still don't get the "ick" factor here. Maybe being a cook and a gardener helps, I don't know. What's the difference between unpacking a box holding a piece of furniture cradled in stuff made of dried, squashed peanut hulls and dried, squashed mushrooms versus stuff made of dried, squashed wood pulp? They are both brown and made of plant materials. 


Rob Spiegel
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Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Rob Spiegel   2/15/2012 12:16:57 PM
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That makes sense, Ann. The would reduce the "ick" factor. Yet the ick factor shouldn't be a big deal, since the material would be inert. Some people, though, are particularly uncomfortable with any kind of fungus. I'm going to miss bubble wrap.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Packaging materials grown from mushrooms
Ann R. Thryft   2/15/2012 12:10:25 PM
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Printer, thanks for your comment. I understand what makes you wonder about making this into a kind of paper. I think it would have to be very highly processed, like wood pulp, because the materials are similarly large and rough. So I think it would end up being pretty expensive, unless produced on a very large scale. If this material could be a drop in replacement to existing wood pulp paper manufacturing facilities, that might keep the cost the same as paper. The main thing that would then be "green" about it would be the fact that it doesn't kill trees, and it does use waste material. 

I'm not sure I understand what you mean by plastic, though--there are so many different kinds. Can you clarify that question a bit more?


Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Ann R. Thryft   2/15/2012 12:09:23 PM
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Rob, my understanding is that the packaging materials are not aimed primarily at consumers, but at businesses that sell and ship products to consumers. Some of the examples given for packaging are for heavy and/or fragile items like wine bottles and furniture. Insulation is to be aimed at the construction industry. Other R&D they're involved in includes replacements for plastic foam used in cars, and structural biocomposite materials using engineered textiles, such as fiberglass and carbon fibers. This is partly why I think the "ick" factor is over-rated. When you order something online or from a catalog, you get what you get in your shipping box. I've seen a huge variety of crushed brown paper, various versions of bubble wrap, and pellets (petro- and bio-based).


Printer
User Rank
Iron
Re: Packaging materials grown from mushrooms
Printer   2/15/2012 9:31:09 AM
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I wonder when this is crushed like wood pulp if it could possibly become a green paper or type of plastic. Any thoughts on that?

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Rob Spiegel   2/14/2012 3:10:11 PM
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Ann, at what point do products with this material show up for consumers? Has the company made any progress with major retailers, or is this a niche product sold online? 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Ann R. Thryft   2/14/2012 12:01:11 PM
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No worries, I didn't assume it was personal. But I did want to make it clear that I had the same initial concerns. 

What I find interesting is how vigilant so many people are about the possible problems with new materials, yet how apparently complacent many of us are about the really scary properties of, or consequences of, using existing ones, like Styrofoam, or fibreglass insulation. If we had expressed the same amount of concern about existing petro-based materials, or other harmful materials, to their makers and our government and other authorities maybe we'd be a lot farther down the road to finding valid replacements.

From a business perspective, the fact that a large, successful company like Sealed Air, the inventors of Bubble Wrap, are partnering with this tiny company on a technology that could replace Bubble Wrap tells me that the new technology has a good likelihood of success, and that Ecovative's processes are probably extremely good.

 

 

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