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dhajicek
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Iron
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
dhajicek   2/13/2012 5:11:28 PM
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I'm sorry to sound so negative.  Killing fungus spores is notoriously difficult.  Neither heat nor dehydration is 100% effective.  Maybe they have a good process, let's assume they do.  What happens when this stuff is made by the mega-ton?  You can expect quality control issues.  What happens when it gets wet?  I expect it to smell like what it is.

This is not intended to be a criticism of you.  It was an interesting article.  I would never trust this stuff.  But then I am a typical paranoid engineer.

 

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Ann R. Thryft   2/13/2012 4:04:54 PM
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The fungus is not active any more, nor does it smell, nor is it damp. The company already thought of those problems and has eliminated them. Living in a place where mold grows on plastic, as well as every other surface, and being highly allergic to mold and mildew, I made sure to find out all that before reporting this story. As the story says, growth is stopped through dehydration and heat treatment. There's more info about the process on their websites that addresses your concerns.


dhajicek
User Rank
Iron
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
dhajicek   2/13/2012 3:02:25 PM
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Interesting, but perhaps one of the worst ideas I've heard of in a while.  Just ignore the esthetics, smell and process issues for a while.

Here they are proposing that we take into our houses large amounts of active fungus, specialized in attacking organic matter.  My house is made from mostly organic matter and I do not want it to be decomposed.

I am also sensitive to mold, which could be a real issue here.  Namely people with sensitivities or who will develop sensitivities to this active fungus.

I understand that fungus is all around us.  But why go out of our way to bring vast quantities of it into our houses?  It is asking for trouble.

Dave Hajicek

 

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Rob Spiegel   2/13/2012 2:19:44 PM
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Good point, Ann. For a certain portion of the population, it will be easy to switch to a new esthetic. For the mass market, I would imagine it will take some time, especially if early adopters get ridiculed for their earthy taste.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Ann R. Thryft   2/13/2012 1:53:09 PM
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Rob, I agree in general. But for this material, since it's made out of bulky organic materials in shades of mostly brown, that might be tough to do  I still think we need to re-adjust our esthetic sense toward more organic-looking stuff, especially if this is the wave of the future. OTOH, maybe they can grow an outer layer that's a more pleasing color, or use natural dyes or something.


Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Ann R. Thryft   2/13/2012 1:51:34 PM
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naperlou, I think that's a good question, and one we always have to consider with new technology. Information on the company's two websites is not always easy to find, but I did come across some statements about their process and how scalable it is. Of course, only time will tell.


Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Rob Spiegel   2/13/2012 12:33:49 PM
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Ann, I agree with your earlier thought that function can provide its own form of beauty. That said, if there is widespread acceptance of household products and furniture made with new materials, the design folks will be motivated to revamp the early efforts into designs with real aesthetics.

 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
Ann R. Thryft   2/13/2012 12:19:53 PM
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I think Rob has two good points: that it's kind of hippy look may date it eventually--unless by then we're all wearing burlap anyway-- and that no matter how ugly some may find this stuff, if it's inside something--like insulation inside walls--appearance may not matter much.


ChasChas
User Rank
Gold
Re: Possible applications?
ChasChas   2/13/2012 9:57:15 AM
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This is great! Plant a bedroom when the baby is born. It will be all grown in when the child needs it.

naperlou
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Blogger
Re: Not pretty, but highly functional
naperlou   2/13/2012 9:47:18 AM
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Natural materials are great, but I wonder how they will scale up.  This seems to be a problem for all alternatives to hydrocarbon based materials.  The fact is that chemical plants can be engineered to make massive amounts of material quite easily.  We hear about these organic alternatives, then it all peters out.  Not long ago containers made from corn stalks were going to replace plastic.  These are the clear containers that fruits and vegetables might come in.  I haven't heard about it much since.  I hope that is not the situation here.  Reducing our dependence on oil is a good thing. 

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