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wankap
User Rank
Iron
Re: New technology vs Stirling
wankap   2/8/2012 2:16:52 PM
NO RATINGS
The physical engine was simulated in Solid Works, a plastic printer was utilized to create most of the machine parts, although it could not handle some of the smaller parts and the central shaft has to be drilled out and replaced with a firmer rod. I'm still searching for a plastic printer or machinest that can do the hot-spot stuff out of delrin or teflon like material. The prototype may be running by late April if I can get the hot spot stuff done soon.

FCHTMC utilizes a refigerant to create internal steam, then it recycles that refrigerant. The oil is used to heat the hot spots. Energy is also stored in the CEM which plugs into the bottom of the FCHTMC and provides the engine hotspots and other features. I tried to just upload a picture but this webpage wants video's I have some stuff on the engine on utube, set up prior to receiving the patent.

The production parts are to be constructed in ceramic, SC30 for hot spots, heat exchangers, and Z500 for body.

dconner
User Rank
Iron
Re: New technology vs Stirling
dconner   2/8/2012 11:54:43 AM
NO RATINGS
Your description of the FCHTMC engine sounds interesting. Do you have a link to a video of one running?

wankap
User Rank
Iron
New technology vs Stirling
wankap   2/8/2012 10:51:03 AM
NO RATINGS
The FCHTMC engine recently patented is smaller than the stirling, has no exposed mechanics, confines all energy within while only exporting what it uses in the reaction. Combined with a 6 inch dome black-body reactor, this device shall actully deliver work from normal sunlight shining on the reactor. The reactor does two things it heats oil which is imported into the engine to create power, the engine exports what heat it uses through its heat exchanger. The reactor also creates a little steam which then drives a small turbine to create electricity to trigger the FCHTMC. FCHTMC requires no started motor or starting push as the timing funtions are entirely electronic it detects the just after tdc piston, it then applies force to that piston to start itself. In the smaller version a 1/4-20 output shaft connection may be applied to a fan or small dynamo type generator or other application.

FCHTMC is the acronym for (Fluid Connected Heat to Motion Converter patent 7980080) 

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Engine a piece of art
Tool_maker   2/8/2012 6:39:08 AM
NO RATINGS
Some of the questions here remind me of English Lit classes I had as a young college student. We would spend 3 hours reading a book and then 3 weeks beating up the book to try and wring out what the author was saying. Then I found a quote from Edgar Allen Poe where he states that sometimes the author writes purely for the sake of art. When I presented this quote to an Eng Lit professor, he told me I was misinterpreting what Poe said.

To Mr Conner, you were given an assignment/challenge and created an innovative solution. Congratulations and who cares what it really does. All of us have probably successfully designed something for someone in which the end use is of little matter. But beating the challenge is the reward. Well done.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Engine a piece of art
Charles Murray   2/7/2012 6:50:21 PM
NO RATINGS
I second what you've said here, William. I, too, wondered what the artist is doing with the engine. For virtually every Design News reader, however, the real beauty lies in Doug Conner's design. 

Jon Titus
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Very Good Engineering
Jon Titus   2/7/2012 5:31:23 PM
NO RATINGS
I've seen some nice milling machines on ebay, but it might take a rigging company to get one in your shop or garage.  Micro-Mark sells a nice small milling machine for $750 and then of course you'd need collets and cutters, too.  Maybe an e-machine shop would be a better choice.  You do nice work with a small lathe, hand tools, and drill presses.

dconner
User Rank
Iron
Re: Very Good Engineering
dconner   2/7/2012 5:08:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks Jon,

I have a 7x10 lathe and two drill presses. Everything else is done with hand tools. A milling machine would be nice, but you can do a lot with a hack saw and files. If i had a milling machine I would design my engines with fewer parts, but the parts would be more complex.  I keep thinking I'll have emachineshop or someone else build the parts for my next engine instead of buying a milling machine. I've been thinking that for the last 3 eingines.

 

Justajo
User Rank
Gold
Re: Engine a piece of art
Justajo   2/7/2012 4:10:14 PM
NO RATINGS
It is quite nice, but like you, Beth, I too wonder what the sculpure it is intended to move looks like. Guess I missed the video you mentioned. I only saw a slideshow. (Speaking of slideshows, it would be nice if some gadget freak here at Design News or elsewhere could figure out a way to have an imbedded show instead of having to reload the whole page with each image.) Still, nice work. 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Engine a piece of art
Ann R. Thryft   2/7/2012 1:36:57 PM

What a cool idea. That looks like something that could power up all the weird SF Bay iron sculpture and make it move, if the artists so desired. The last time I saw them they were all static.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Engine a piece of art
Rob Spiegel   2/7/2012 12:58:20 PM
NO RATINGS
We have a similar installation here in Albuquerque, just before I-40 comes into the city. Up on the canyon hills there's a sculpture that looks like a large steel flower. Next to it is a solar-powered light that shines the colors of the rainbow one by one. So the metal flower turns blue, then green, etc. Needless to say, when the sky has been overcast for a few days, the motor and light don't work. But it's rarely overcast for long here, so most of the time it works. There must be a light sensor connected to the motor, since it is idle during sunlight.

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