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apresher
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Blogger
Safety
apresher   2/13/2012 2:06:42 PM
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Rob,  Clearly safety as a software task is a growing approach but there are still many hardware and software options.  Simpler machines (low axis and I/O count) may have different needs than much more complex systems. But the trend is clearly safety more tightly integrated into the control software than ever before.  Also the suppliers of safety relays, safety PLCs also are providing new solutions.  Should be an interesting area of automation and control as we move ahead.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Changing Mindset with Safety
Rob Spiegel   2/13/2012 12:29:31 PM
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Good points, Apresher. I, too, have noticed that safety is no longer a separate system that works as a burden on the automation system. Now it is integrated into control and it has become one more factor that improves uptime. I remember there was resistance to the blend of control and safety networks at first, but now it seems that the blend of safety and control networks is pretty much fully accepted.

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Changing Mindset with Safety
apresher   2/13/2012 9:20:05 AM
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Along with regulations that are forcing new safety standards for machine builders, there is a changing mindset with safety.  Safety implementing on one controller, one network is making machine safety an exciting technology area for automation and control innovation. One of the biggest advantages of "integrated safety" is much better diagnostics. In the past, machine and safety controls were separate from each other. Safety is not viewed as a requirement anymore for many machines, but a way to improve their machine's functionality that provides a competitive advantage. With printing machines, for example, it's a huge benefit if the end user can keep the machines running while refining the process or addressing potential safety issues. Software developments and redundant processing make this a very interesting area.

Ozark Sage
User Rank
Silver
Re: Safety IP
Ozark Sage   2/3/2012 3:21:20 PM
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Rob Spiegel  look for [OK] dirrectly above your 2/2/20012 3:17:49 PM Msg. Sorry about that!

Ozark Sage
User Rank
Silver
Re: Safety IP
Ozark Sage   2/2/2012 5:32:27 PM
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OK  The writer may have a contract software job to produce product that he/she may or may not pass rights to others to use.  If the software works well it may be lawfully or otherwise code copied. embedded, used for different purposes or transfered and reapear in totally different products or different manufactures arround the world. 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Safety IP
Rob Spiegel   2/2/2012 3:17:49 PM
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Hi Ozark Sage. Not sure I understand your question. Perhaps you could explain what you man about safety software and the IP realm. Thanks.

Ozark Sage
User Rank
Silver
Re: Safety IP
Ozark Sage   2/2/2012 3:15:15 PM
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Rob I wonder how or what you and the other blogers personally think the various generated software will cause in the IP realm (other than increased legal cost)? 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Safety as a product
Rob Spiegel   2/2/2012 11:39:34 AM
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That was a long time ago, Chuck. My guess is that stamping plants can't get away with those dangerous shortcuts any longer. OSHA is much stronger now than it was back then.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Safety as a product
Charles Murray   2/1/2012 7:43:00 PM
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That's amazing, Rob. I wonder if those stamping machines enjoy the same legal situation as table saws, i.e., "use it at your own risk." In legal cases involving table saws, lwyers hav traditionally argued that users understand the propensity of sharp to edges to cut.  

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Safety as a product
Rob Spiegel   2/1/2012 3:38:08 PM
NO RATINGS
You're right about that, Chuck. I worked briefly at a stamping plant that had stamping machines that required you push two button to activate the stamp action -- thus making sure your hands were out of the way. However, if you didn't hold the sheet metal in position, there were stamping errors. So, they asked employees to hold the metal in position and push one of the two buttons with your forehead.

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