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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: A helping hand
Ann R. Thryft   1/25/2012 1:01:16 PM
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Wow, this story spurred some interesting comments.

Alex, robots as COTS makes total sense to me, having written not long ago for COTS Journal. Thanks for that insight. And as to soldiers being COTS, I nearly fell off my seat laughing, but, you may be right. In any case, I was happy to see NASA making use of existing technology from outside its own sphere that someone else spent the R&D dollars on, another way of defining COTS.

I think Jenn's and Beth's points are also good. Using machines for low-level routine stuff, like servicing, but humans for more difficult troubleshooting makes sense. 


Jennifer Campbell
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Re: A helping hand
Jennifer Campbell   1/25/2012 11:31:41 AM
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Agreed. Thanks for clarifying your point, Beth.

Beth Stackpole
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Re: A helping hand
Beth Stackpole   1/25/2012 10:33:39 AM
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I didn't mean to imply that we shouldn't send humans into space, Jenn. I totally agree with you. I just think for some of the more mundane chores, have an adept set of robot hands to do the work is definitely a more cost-effective way.

Alexander Wolfe
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COTS in Space
Alexander Wolfe   1/25/2012 10:21:52 AM
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It's significant to note that NASA, in the face of the massive budget cuts it's been subjected to over the past several years, is taking a page from the military in moving from build-it-yourself to using COTS. COTS stands for commercial-off-the-shelf systems. It took the military a good 25 years from talking about COTS to actually doing it on a widespread basis. (Of course, now many soldiers themselves are COTS, but that's another story.) Anyway, so it makes lots of sense for NASA to do this, buy and customize rather than build from scratch, which they can't support.

Jennifer Campbell
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Gold
Re: A helping hand
Jennifer Campbell   1/25/2012 9:48:42 AM
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I agree with you, Beth, but I don't think we should entirely rule out sending humans to space. We need people to fix the machines that may break/inexplicably stop working. Also, and a lot of people may disagree with me here, but I think that human exploration in space can be just as effective, if not more so, than robotic exploration. After all, robots can't think or articulate what they see. While the advances in robotics these days are nothing short of remarkable, there is still something to be said for a human doing the work.

Beth Stackpole
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A helping hand
Beth Stackpole   1/25/2012 6:46:25 AM
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It makes perfect sense that the dexterity and finesse involved in applying robotics to complex and tricky medical procedures could have huge bearing on other applications, particularly those that relate to space. It's difficult (not to mention dangerous and expensive) to put people in space and given gravity issues, those trained professionals don't have the same dexterity and flexibility for motor skills that they otherwise would have on earth. Seems like a natural solution.

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