HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
uniquity@uniquitypsych.com
User Rank
Gold
Kitchen safety
uniquity@uniquitypsych.com   1/17/2012 12:34:33 PM
NO RATINGS
I have learned from experience that good safety deivces are hard to find.  My wife and I do not believe in the learn by experience method of child rearing.  We consider it a form of child endangerment.  That type of child learning could result in burning our house to the ground, along with injury or death to us.

We have a granddaughter who just turned two living with us since her birth.  I have had to be very inovative about safety issuses.  First, we have a wall heater in our living room.  I had to make a barrier out of PVC pipe to keep her away from the heater. 

 She got tall enough to reach the pots on our electric cooktop.  After researching the internet for stove safety panels I realized that there were no affordable, effective items on the market.  I built one using some aluminum strips, right angle brackets, 1/4-20 screws, wing nuts, and a 1/2" thick plastic sheet.  The wing nuts, which face the cooktop, are easy for an adult to remove in order to clean the top. 

 The last job was when she discovered the start button on the electronic control panel for the dishwasher.  I made a removable cover out of some aluminum and roof flashing that fits over the top of the door.  It covers the entire control panel and has a hole drilled in it to see the green light that goes on when the cylce is done. 

I also had to make my own safety catches for the kitchen cabinets and drawers.  We tried commercial plastic ones that broke and could be opened by a kid.  What I made doesn't look great, but they do the job. 

It seems like the only answer to some safety ptoblems is the do it yourself method.  This might not help most of the general public, but it should be useful for many with an engineering background.



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Do you long for the days of retro video gaming? Here's how you can turn an old PC into an old-school arcade cabinet with only $100 and a bit of woodwork.
A Vienna, Austria-based startup called Heliofloat has designed a platform of solar panels that can be deployed in lakes or oceans to generate solar-based electricity.
Electrical engineers from the University of Washington and Delft University of Technology have developed a new type of sensor-based platform that harvests energy from radio waves for electricity.
A simple new chemical method for repairing and recycling notoriously difficult carbon fiber composites has been developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research. An entire component can be completely recycled, including reclaiming its expensive carbon fibers for reuse.
In today’s connected world we are seeing the beginning of connected homes, smart grids, self-driving automobiles, drones, and many other amazing devices. Out of all the soon-to-be connected devices, which device poses the greatest dangerous to its users and society?
More:Blogs|News
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
May 2 - 6, Embedded System Design Techniques™ - Rapid Prototyping Embedded Systems using Micro Python
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service