HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/2
Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Patience required
Alexander Wolfe   1/12/2012 9:26:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Chuck, I definitely had your skepticism -- as well as your history of deep reporting on batteries (e.g., Electric Vehicles: How Far Have We Come in 100 Years? ) -- in mind when I was talking with the Mercedes R&D person. That's why I thought it was so significant that his perspective was that there will indeed be progress down the road, and why I reported it. It's true that he didn't provide specifics but he had a very strong feeling that more research on the chemistry front would yield improvements. I definitely didn't take it that he was repeating a company or party line, but that this was his true feeling as an engineer who's very plugged into automotive research. So, like I said, even though I didn't have much in the way of specifics to report in the article, I felt that it was important to put his view into the piece.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Patience required
Charles Murray   1/12/2012 7:02:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Having talked with EV battery makers on a regular since 1988, I have to admit to a little bit of skepticism when I hear about automakers predicting serious range boosts coming from the battery front. Going back to 2000, the United States Advanced Battery Consortium has pumped hundreds of millions of dollars into research, particularly when zero emission vehicle mandates loomed on the horizon. The research always did some good, but the results have been evolutionary, not revolutionary. Boosts in specific energy have always been painstakingly slow. I would never say that batteries will remain forever stalled, but I think we will need to be patient.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Another car maker researching composites
Dave Palmer   1/12/2012 1:51:51 PM
NO RATINGS
@Alex: Did the Mercedes researcher you spoke with mention any specific areas of the vehicle where Mercedes is considering using composites?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Another car maker researching composites
Ann R. Thryft   1/12/2012 12:34:55 PM
NO RATINGS

The info on composites and batteries is of great interest from the materials standpoint--thanks, Alex for this heartening input from yet another car manufacturer who's researching CFRP composites, in addition to Ford, Audi and several others. Like Beth, though, I'm not impressed with the infotainment/telematics stuff.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
EE Buzz
Rob Spiegel   1/12/2012 8:17:47 AM
NO RATINGS

The EE Buzz link at the bottom of this article offers a great snapshot of the Consumer Electronics show. As well as presenting the headlines, a quick click sends you through to more in-depth coverage. Nice feature.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
The good and bad of telematics
Beth Stackpole   1/12/2012 6:32:10 AM
NO RATINGS
It's almost surreal what's happening in terms of telematics and consumer electronics-type functionality that is being added to cars. I think the idea of leveraging the cloud to feed GPS, traffic, and safety data to your car really elevates the utility of GPS technology if it can become your personal guide to traffic avoidance based on your typical route traveled, etc. I also love the idea of feeding back all the sensor data generated by the car through the cloud so diagnostic technicians can make real and informed suggestions about what needs addressing on your car (as opposed to now where a sensor light goes on that you can choose to ignore for weeks or months on end).

Where I still have to draw the line is the whole digital concierge/rolling social media machine. For the life of me, I still don't get what kind of safety/driving utility having Facebook hooked into the electronics of your vehicle can do other than serve as a cause for driver distraction or a marketing feed to broadcast your daily routines, choices of restaurants, stores where you do errands etc. to some marketing guru who will just use it to try to sell you more stuff.

<<  <  Page 2/2


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service