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OLD_CURMUDGEON   1/2/2012 8:41:57 AM
It was interesting to read the comments here.  I can tell you that this in not necessariy a new phenomenon in dealing w/ corporations.  More than 60 years ago, my mother, when dissatisfied w/ a product, would sit down at the kitchen table and compose a very legible & succinct letter explaining the problem.  Guess who she always sent the letter to?  It was none other than the president or CEO of the corporation responsible for the product.  And, she ALWAYS got relief.  In those days however, it was usually in the form of a personal letter of apology SIGNED by the president himself.  Furthermore, there may have been some other forms of remediation, as dictated by the specific incident.

The major problem nowadays however is in determining WHO is the ultimate responsible party.  With so many intertwined corporate entities, it's often very difficult, if not impossible, to determine WHO is in charge.  Personally I had a consumer issue w/ a RAMADA INN stay in the Orlando area.  Even with the power of GOOGLE, WIKIPEDIA, and other extremely powerful search engines, I was unable to find the CEO of the RAMADA INN chain.  Years ago, one could go to the local public library.  They had a large reference book of corporate information, including head offices, head officers names, addresses, telephone numbers, etc.  It made the search much easier.  I suspect that tome is no longer available.  I have not checked however.

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Write to the president of the company
FinnickyFinn   12/20/2011 7:10:48 AM
It always depends on who you write to. In cases like this I don't even bother with the customer service department of the manufacturer, but write directly to the president of the company. Keep the letter short, state your objections followed by your demands. If you can reference a competitor that does it better, add this in. But keep it all to half a page tops. I did this in a few cases and always got a resolution that I could live with in the end. It may not be exactly what I asked for, but good enough and a sure sign that at least the president of the company wants to make things right. In your case a bag with a dozen rubber feet might have done the trick. Costs the company a few bucks plus shipping, but turns your perception of the company from 'dissatisfied' to 'awesome'. If they are smart they throw in a calendar and a baseball cap with an apology.

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Oppie   12/19/2011 5:08:15 PM
I bought a 5KW powermate back in '99 and though noisy as heck (old school valves in block design) it's paid for itself many times over. Was thinking of replacing it with a diesel but was appaled at the cost and wary about availability of repair parts. The Honda inverter generators are intriguing: Variable speed engine that generates DC and feeds an inverter. Engine speed is proportional to load. Crazy long run times at partial loads.

Only problem I had with the powermate was a lack of skids to move it on. I didn't want the steel frame to be dragged on the cement so drilled a few holes and screwed into a couple of 2" X 2" rails, which has held up well.

A friend was troubleshooting his 7800W powermate generator and upon request Pramac sent us a schematic. The owners manual is available online.

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Thanks for the heads up
rgusekatptreb   12/19/2011 3:59:35 PM
I purchased this Coleman Generator quite few years ago for a "just in case" scenario.  I test fired it and put it away.  This last October Noreaster in New England gave me cause to resurrect it.  It ran ok except for an occasional sputtering (loading didn't seem to be the cause and it was fresh gas).  I will haul it out again and check that bolt.  Since it is no longer manufactured or supported I think I'll purchase a back-up for it.  Thank you very much for the information.

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