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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D Modeling -> Printing
Ann R. Thryft   12/29/2011 12:00:36 PM
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Thanks, Beth, that's what I thought. It would be interesting to find out what, if any, upper limits there are on complexity for 3D printing. Does anyone know if there's some kind of gauge to use?


Beth Stackpole
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Re: 3D Modeling -> Printing
Beth Stackpole   12/28/2011 7:24:34 AM
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I think that was what I was getting at in my comments earlier. I think you're right Ann--I'm not so sure current 3D printing capabilities could produce an entire ship of this complexity. Even though it is a scaled model, it's still pretty complex in terms of components and integrated systems.

I'm not sure what the most complex 3D printed model/component has been. I do know we've reported on the Urbee EV vehicle from KOR Logic, which was 3D printed for the prototyping stage. But even with that example, it wasn't all the components of the vehicle that were 3D printed--just the main body components.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: 3D Modeling -> Printing
Ann R. Thryft   12/27/2011 12:20:15 PM
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I think Jack's question is an interesting one. Beth, do you think 3D printing is capable of handling such a complex CAD model? For that matter, what is the most complex CAD model 3D printers can handle? In interviews for my December feature on AM

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=236261

vendors suggested that "complex parts" meant components of large systems like aircraft, not an entire plane or ship.


Jack Rupert, PE
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Platinum
Re: 3D Modeling -> Printing
Jack Rupert, PE   12/27/2011 12:02:28 PM
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That might be a good marketing opportunity for the printer companies, to partner with somebody like this.  The battleship model will probably get a lot cross-market media attention and they could demonstrate what their products can do.

Beth Stackpole
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Re: 3D Modeling -> Printing
Beth Stackpole   12/27/2011 8:22:05 AM
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That's definitely an interesting idea, Jack, and one that's likely viable. It would really depend on whether this crew has access to 3D printing technology, which you know is expensive. I don't think the size or the materials would preclude the use of 3D printers, although the intricacy of all the modules and interconnected components and systems might make it difficult.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Platinum
3D Modeling -> Printing
Jack Rupert, PE   12/26/2011 1:48:03 PM
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To combine a couple of Design News articles....  I wonder if it would be useful, in this case to utilize a 3D printer?  Depending upon the material that the printer makes (and the size capability), this might be a good application for it.  Here he as the 3D model created and might be able to go directly from virtual to real with a push of a button.

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: CAD
Beth Stackpole   12/20/2011 6:37:28 AM
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Absolutely, CAD is playing a role in other historical explorations--ship building or otherwise. We've reported in the past on 3D tools like CAD and visualization packages being used to reconstruct archeological sites like the Great Pyramid of Kheops. Specifically, French architect Jean-Pierre Houdin tapped Dassault's 3D solutions to recreate the pyramid construction site in 3D.

Alexander Wolfe
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Blogger
Re: CAD
Alexander Wolfe   12/19/2011 6:53:29 PM
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Two battleships on one page is almost more than I can take, but that's for traffic reasons. As for the story, this is an excellent, fascinating, and valuable example of historical archaeology brought to life via CAD. Kudos to McKinney. I wonder if there's other work going on regarding ships built centuries earlier, where the CAD tools may help uncover/illuminate mysteries regarding their construction.

Lyngengr
User Rank
Iron
Mighty Mo still alive
Lyngengr   12/19/2011 12:59:37 PM
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The actual battleship is anchored in Pearl Harbor next to the Arizona memorial.  It is possible to take a tour of the inner workings of the ship which will let you see inside the gun turrents and engine room.  Highly recommended!

EricMJones
User Rank
Gold
Re: Battleships
EricMJones   12/19/2011 9:41:25 AM
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For those battleship aficionados out there. see:

http://www.periheliondesign.com/downloads/yamatomusashi.pdf

Eric

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