HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
williamlweaver
User Rank
Platinum
Things to Come
williamlweaver   12/15/2011 9:08:12 AM
This is fantastic news on so many levels. Collaborative design is a important emerging technology and the availability of subscription-based professional design tools is a critical step in its development and adoption. Kudos to Siemens PLM Software for not only providing an innovative product but for having the courage to try out a new revenue model.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Things to Come
Beth Stackpole   12/15/2011 9:15:10 AM
I agree William. Now obviously this tool is just available to the Local Motors community, but if there is traction, I would imagine, Siemens (and potentially other CAD/PLM providers) would explore other, similar partnerships and licensing arrangements. The high cost of professional CAD has long been an inhibitor. Between announcements like this and some of the lower cost tools released over the last few years, you don't necessarily have to have flush pockets to get into 3D digital modeling.

 

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
TANSTAAFL
TJ McDermott   12/15/2011 9:42:30 AM
Heinlein readers should recognize that acronym.

I see a carefully crafted marketing phrase in the statement:

"Siemens officials say it has the same technology as the full-function version of Solid Edge, including 3D parts modeling with synchronous technology -- but at price point comparable to some of the free or low-cost tools."

I read "It has the same technology" as saying it does not have all the functions.

The question I'd ask first is "What's missing?"  3D parts modeling is good, but a single part does not exist alone.  Assemblies put parts together.

TANSTAAFL.  There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch.  They're not giving away a full function modeling suite, so what's missing?

$240 per year is VERY attractive, if the software is not limited to much.  That's MUCH less than the annual renewal fee for full function 3D modeling software.

Another caveat I'd worry about is where the software actually resides.  Is it run from the cloud, or does one download a large package.  I'd much prefer to run locally instead of the cloud.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: TANSTAAFL
Beth Stackpole   12/15/2011 9:53:21 AM
Good questions, TJ. I'll see if I can get Siemens to wade in. My guess, and it's only a guess, is that the parts modeling with synchronous technology is good for parts, not assemblies. If I recall, that's how they rolled it out initially with SolidEdge--first it supported ST with parts, then a latter release with assemblies. I will circle back once I have some more definitive answers.

johnhfox
User Rank
Iron
Re: TANSTAAFL
johnhfox   12/15/2011 8:17:41 PM

I’ll wade in:  Solid Edge Design1 can be used for both parts and assemblies.  The software does not reside in the cloud – it installs and runs on the user’s machine.  Early reaction from users has been positive, in terms of the functionality the tool offers and the price point.  TJ, if not a free lunch, you might consider this a “value meal.” ;-)

John Fox
VP Marketing
Siemens PLM Software


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: TANSTAAFL
Beth Stackpole   12/16/2011 7:19:13 AM
Thanks for wading in, John, and for setting the record straight. Can you be a bit more specific as to what this version lacks in terms of features and capabilities that would be in the full-priced release of Solid Edge?

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Pay as you go
Alexander Wolfe   12/19/2011 7:01:12 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm wondering if this is just another version of a big company eating its own dog food so that it isn't giving up low-end business. It's the same thing with cloud, where the Autodesks of the world (Siemens, in this story) have expensive, per seat or site licensed products. But they know there are customers that can't pay, have lower end needs, or use freeware. So they search around the margins for ways to get their business. In some sense, cloud and subscription-based tools are the new-age version of "lite" programs sold back in the day. Not a really fair comparison, but you get the analogy.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pay as you go
Beth Stackpole   12/20/2011 6:47:39 AM
NO RATINGS
Funny, just interviewed a CAD analyst that said much the same thing. I think there is growing recognition that there are engineers out there--and more to come, given the younger generation born and bred on Web-based and mobile software tools--that are going to want bite-sized, lite and far more accessible design tools to work the way they're accustomed to working. Perhaps Siemens, Autodesk, and the rest of the CAD arena is experimenting with these new licensing models to see what kind of traction they can get, leading to a dual-licensing model strategy that hits both the high and low ends in the future.

johnhfox
User Rank
Iron
Re: TANSTAAFL
johnhfox   12/20/2011 9:38:29 PM
NO RATINGS
Beth: In answer to your earlier question, we worked very closely with Local Motors to determine what CAD functionality was most important to their design community and at what price.  This helped us determine what was in and what was out.  So for example, we did not include specialized functionality such as simulation, tubing and automated drawings.  One of our goals was to avoid including features that were not central requirements of this group and would have raised the price unnecessarily.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: TANSTAAFL
Beth Stackpole   12/21/2011 6:26:09 AM
NO RATINGS
Seems like a reasonable approach to weeding out potential "luxury" or "overkill" features. After all, over the years, CAD has become packed with zillions of features and add-on capabilities that take it in all kinds of directions. Perhaps, this is a back to your roots strategy for making the tools more affordable. Thanks for you input, John.



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Self-driving vehicle technology could grow rapidly over the next two decades, with nearly 95 million “autonomous-capable” cars being sold annually around the world by 2035, a new study predicts.
MIT’s Senseable City Lab recently announced the program’s next big project: “Local Warming.” The concept involves saving on energy by heating the occupants within a room, not the room itself.
The fun factor continues to draw developers to Linux. This open-source system continues to succeed in the market and in the hearts and minds of developers. Design News will delve into this territory with next week's Continuing Education Class titled, “Introduction to Linux Device Drivers.”
Dean Kamen tells an audience at MD&M East 2014 how his team created the DEKA Arm to meet DARPA's challenge to design a better prosthetic arm for wounded veterans.
The new draw-it-on-a-napkin is the CAD program. As CAD programs become more ubiquitous and easier to use, they have replaced 2D sketching for early concepting.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service