HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Page 1/4  >  >>
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Shifting of jobs
Rob Spiegel   4/12/2012 3:43:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, I agree with your point -- as does the Association of Robotics. If the computer industry is any indication, job creation in robotics may be greater than we think. The computer industry -- according to gov. studies -- did not deliver net job reduction until the 1990s. The industry simply created more jobs (in dollars) than it eliminated. Of course, once the efficiencies kicked in, there was massive job reduction. Eight ga-zillion secretaries lost their jobs.

Mike Hodge
User Rank
Iron
Shifting of jobs
Mike Hodge   4/12/2012 2:15:05 PM
NO RATINGS


Interesting point about the displacement of jobs (as opposed to a simple net loss of jobs). It's clear that automation will continue to reduce the number of jobs in certain sectors of manufacturing. The following article concedes this, but offers the similar perspective that automation may also open doors to new jobs related to the building and maintenance of robots:     
http://blogs.ptc.com/2012/04/06/does-increased-automation-steal-manufacturing-jobs/ 


 

 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Demand increase
Rob Spiegel   1/19/2012 11:49:26 AM
NO RATINGS
Good comments, Ervin. Robots eliminate jobs that are often repetitive and unpleasant. while the robot industry will not create as many jobs as it eliminates, the jobs it will create will tend to be technical jobs that are likely to be more creative than repetitive and thus more fulfilling. 

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Demand increase
ervin0072002   1/18/2012 1:27:06 PM
NO RATINGS

Someone might have mentioned this too.

1) Yes, robots decrease jobs where they are applied,

2) Price of end product generally goes down and supply increases

3) Demand increases due to lower price which in turn increases sales

4) Supporting jobs increase due to larger production quantities which in turn increase orders from said manufacturer.

 

So while robots decrease jobs in one industry they raise the demand of the population which in turn causes a chain event that brings us back to more jobs. Ideally everything will be extremely cheap and everything will be made by robots. We will all be software and hardware engineers and the world will be a better place... Well almost we would still have lawyers and politicians....

 

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
Robots for quality, not job elimination
vimalkumarp   1/2/2012 12:31:22 AM
NO RATINGS
Robots for quality, not job elimination is an interesting point to note.

The manufacturing industry all over the world is forced to improve their production processes. Robots are being used to accomplish this.
 while robots are certainly trimming repetitive manufacturing jobs, the robotics industry continues to add jobs at an aggressive rate.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Color me skeptical
Rob Spiegel   12/30/2011 2:14:37 PM
NO RATINGS

Again, good points Naperlou. The human brain is hard to beat. I can certainly understand that computers can beat us on memory and even on some deduction, but we have intuitive powers that are quite remarkable and they will not quickly be replaced. We've all read the articles that Steve Jobs and Einstein were smart, but they were not the smartest guys in the room. However, they both had intuition that can't be matched by smarts. Einstein himself said "You can't get to my equation by deduction."


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Color me skeptical
Rob Spiegel   12/30/2011 2:07:55 PM
NO RATINGS

Good point, Naperlou. I'm glad to see robots take some of these jobs. The repetitive-motion jobs are soul killers. I know, I did these jobs when I was young, There was a time when these jobs paid well. Those days are over. Let machines do these jobs. People will figure out alternatives for work. It's not that hard to get an education in this country.

A life of doing the same weld all day long for years -- with slight adjustments for model changes -- is not a fulfilling life. The pay may have made it worthwhile 40 years ago, but those coming into these jobs now are not getting the same deal.




naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Color me skeptical
naperlou   12/30/2011 12:38:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Jennifer, that may yet come to pass.  One thing to remember, though, is that robots are machines.  They need to be built, monitored, calibrated, repaired and replaced.  They do have a finite lifetime.  This is mostly becuase those pesky human engineers keep coming up with something better.  I have lived with the expectation that computers would take over jobs that required real thinking for decades.  Well, it has not happened yet.  I have actually designed systems that had some "intelligence" in them.  Believe me, it is rudimentary. 

Machines are just an extension of the human being.  They are tools.  As we develop tools and do research we keep altering the mix between the human and machine.  I wouldn't be so pessimistic.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Color me skeptical
naperlou   12/30/2011 12:32:31 PM
NO RATINGS
Alex, actually, the robot situation is exactly analogous to the computerization situation.  In the end, a more efficient economy means that more products will be made with higher quality at lower cost.  It does come with dislocation, but that is inevitable.

I am old enough to remember a cartoon that my father had.  It said, you too could be replaced by a button,  I still tell that to my sons, and they just look at me funny. 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: the problem of unskilled labor
Ann R. Thryft   12/28/2011 12:54:07 PM
NO RATINGS

Andrew, that is quite heartening that your company has created 39 jobs from ABB's welding robot department. I wonder how that compares with other industrial robot uses aside from welding. Does anyone know?


Page 1/4  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
From home enthusiasts to workers on the manufacturing floor, everyone's imagination is captured by the potential of 3D printing. Prototyping, spare parts creation, art delivery, human organ creation, and even mass product production are all being targeted as current and potential uses for the technology.
ABI Research, a firm based in the UK that specializes in analyzing global connectivity and other emerging technologies, estimates there will be 40.9 billion active wirelessly interconnected “things” by 2020. The driving force is the usual suspect: the Internet of Things.
Just in time for Earth Day, chemicals leader Bayer MaterialScience reported from the UTECH Europe 2015 polyurethane show on programs and applications using its materials to help reduce energy usage. The company also gave an update on its CO2-based PU as that eco-friendly material comes closer to production.
Solar and wind energy are becoming more viable as a source of energy on the electric grid. For decades, the major drawback to solar and wind was that they’re temperamental. A cloudy day kills solar and a still day renders the wind turbines useless. Automation tools, however, are providing a path to help these renewables become practical.
In honor of Earth Day, the National Security Agency has launched the STEM Recycling Challenge in Maryland schools to encourage kids to think about where the garbage they throw out every day actually goes. The agency has also introduced “Dunk,” a muscular blue cartoon recycling bin wearing shorts and sneakers.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 20 - 24, Taking the Internet of Things to the Cloud
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service