HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Page 1/2  >  >>
Steven_Dean
User Rank
Iron
Re: Freescale info
Steven_Dean   1/2/2012 8:22:35 PM
NO RATINGS

@JonVO -

Freescale's commercializtion partner Digi International will be supplying this reference platform.  

Info on Freescale's site here: http://cache.freescale.com/files/32bit/doc/fact_sheet/HMHLTHHUBFS.pdf?fpsp=1

 

Info on Digi's site here:  http://www.digi.com/lp/hhh/

Availability is Q1 2012.  Freescale and Digi would be glad to help you with your interests.  Hit me up on linkedin if you're interested in more info.

We have mutual customers requesting all these connectivity options - and more, so this reference platform is intended to help enable their designs.  Hope that helps!

 

Best -

Steven Dean

Freescale Global Healthcare Segment Lead


JonVO
User Rank
Iron
Freescale info
JonVO   12/20/2011 5:39:38 PM
NO RATINGS
So far as I can tell, information on this dev board is either well-hidden or doesn't exist on the Freescale site. There are a number of interestintg kits, for example a gamers emotion reading dev kit... don't see this one or any info about it, only the HHH network.

Also, many of the wireless data transmission medical monitoring devices use proprietary communication encode/decode because Zigbee, Bluetooth, WiFi, etc, all require too much power or processing overhead.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Wellness overkill
Charles Murray   12/9/2011 6:47:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point regarding the privacy issues. There's a great opportunity here for another smart software engineer to develop a program that looks for a different kind of red flag -- one that potentially finds a loophole for the health insurer.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Wellness overkill
Alexander Wolfe   12/9/2011 10:34:39 AM
NO RATINGS
The analytics portion of portable medical and fitness devices is actually a huge opportunity. Many of them have wi-fi capability, and can download data to PCs, which in turn can be sent to healthcare providers or insurance companies. The possibility of quanititative data feeding into medical studies and then into healthcare profiles and planning are enormously positive, if of course the privacy issues are appropriately handled.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Wellness overkill
Beth Stackpole   12/8/2011 2:00:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Given that predictive analytics is a hot button these days, I would think once the medical device platforms are in it place, it will be no time before someone takes on this challenge and comes up with a variety of software solutions to this problem.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Wellness overkill
Charles Murray   12/8/2011 1:36:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, there can be wellness overkill. As Jenn points out, this could end up being a hypchondriac's dream. The flip side is that you needn't walk around with sensors on your body all day. If you have a bathroom scale with wireless access, it could send your daily weight. If you take your blood pressure once a week, that could be automatically sent. If there's a way to wirelessly send a blood sugar reading, that could be done, too. I don't think it needs to be obtrusive -- unless that's the way you want it. As our source pointed out, they're hoping that some smart software engineer could develop a program that looks for the red flags, so physicians don't have to pour over reams of paper to find the data they need. The point is, the data is now available. How patients and physicians handle it is up to them.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Wellness overkill
Beth Stackpole   12/8/2011 11:33:35 AM
NO RATINGS
@Dr. Fdez: Points well noted and I am iin favor of practicing preventitive medicine vs. the way the system works now where we shell out big dollars on treatments and surgeries that caught have been avoided. And Alex makes a good point as well about emerging reference designs bringing the costs down on many of these systems.

My dad is a former surgeon and he was part of group at a hospital experimenting with electronic patient records and monitoring systems back in the early 90s and it was a nightmare. The systems were expensive and kludgy and the medical staff wanted no part of them because they were an inhibitor, not a facilitator, to workflow and productivity.

Dr. Fdez
User Rank
Iron
Re: Wellness overkill
Dr. Fdez   12/8/2011 11:18:47 AM
NO RATINGS

I get the point of feeling being monitored 24-7, but the idea behind all this development is that we need to change the way we are doing things. I have been a physician for more than a decade and people wait to go to see us when they already have a symptom, which is often too late and medical or surgical treatment is needed. If patients and physicians start changing more to a preventive medicine, rather than treatment oriented, a lot will be saved on health costs and the most important the health of the patient might be restored before it is too late. 

We are used to track our weight more than we used to do in the past, also people without chronic and degenerative diseases track their heart rate while performing exercise and not only that we find now portable ECGs! There will be a day in which we all do this without feeling the burden of being “tracked”, physicians will also understand that it´s better to keep track of your patient than trying to put down fires and performing expensive and complicated surgeries along with expensive medical treatments to solve what would´ve just been a matter of lowering salt in diet, or doing more exercise.

I´d rather jog for 5 more minutes than having a cardiac bypass surgery J


Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Re: Wellness overkill
Jennifer Campbell   12/8/2011 11:15:52 AM
NO RATINGS
I see your point, Beth - seems like a hypochondriac's dream. Although, monitoring like this could be a good thing in that it may keep people out of the doctor's offices by cutting down on unnecessary visits.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Wellness overkill
Alexander Wolfe   12/8/2011 10:22:32 AM
NO RATINGS
Points noted, Beth, but I think it's good to bring healthcare into the real where decisions can be based on quantitative information. In point of fact, the problem now is not that there's no data, it's that it can't be accessed. The stumbling block to electronic medical records is the high cost for implementation at the health provider (i.e. doctor) end. The systems cost at least $60k. As for the dev board discussed here, it's great to see reference designs emerging, which will make it easier for the design engineering community to target this growing market.

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
The damage to Sony from the cyber attack seems to have been heightened by failure to follow two basic security rules.
Voting in Round 4 of our annual Gadget Freak of the Year contest is now open.
Reshoring is picking up steam, but it's not outpacing the overall continuing growth in outsourcing.
Here's a variety of views into the complex production processes at Santa's factory. Happy Holidays!
The Beam Store from Suitable Technologies is managed by remote workers from places as diverse as New York and Sydney, Australia. Employees attend to store visitors through Beam Smart Presence Systems (SPSs) from the company. The systems combine mobility and video conferencing and allow people to communicate directly from a remote location via a screen as well as move around as if they are actually in the room.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jan 12 - 16, Programmable Logic - How do they do that?
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service