HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>
Greg Stirling
User Rank
Platinum
Changing the Oil? Check That Seal
Greg Stirling   11/24/2011 1:40:13 AM
NO RATINGS
I did the exact same thing!  To my Boat!

Changed the oil filter - no problem.  Then while cruzing a remote part of Lake Don Pedro, CA, heard a squeek.  Those were my main bearings, that was my engine, and oil was all over the engine compartment.  First seal stuck to the engine, ended up with two seals, which blew out.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Not exactly a "Made by Monkeys" topic
Rob Spiegel   11/23/2011 11:24:13 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Test Engineer II, it was a "fixed by monkeys" piece rather than an "engineered by monkeys" piece. But the author fessed up early in the article.

bob from maine
User Rank
Platinum
Anti Locktite
bob from maine   11/23/2011 10:17:35 AM
When all else fails and a smoke wrench isn't available a good thing to try is jumper cables and a carbon rod sharpened to a pencil point. Connect the jumper cable to the positive terminal of your battery, put the carbon rod in the other end, touch the tip of the carbon rod to the part you want to heat and in seconds the part is white hot. A caution here, once you have freed several frozen parts you will likely have a dead battery, so a battery charger is appropriate. I get 1/2" carbon sticks 1' long from a local glass blower, but many welding supply places have copper coated carbon rods for cutting using an arc welder, same effect. Never sieze in its many forms is great to prevent galling during installation of high torque parts (the chatter you feel/hear when tightening) but it will not prevent water intrusion on lug nuts, a better substance is 242 locktite (honest - it is removable, seals the threads and prevents water intrusion and lubricates during assembly). Cycles of PB blaster and heat have never failed to aid removal of severely rusted bolts. The carbon rod trick keeps the heat local where it won't do damage. Repeat after me, "Hot metal and cold metal are the same color!".

TEST_ENGINEER_II
User Rank
Iron
Not exactly a "Made by Monkeys" topic
TEST_ENGINEER_II   11/23/2011 9:29:59 AM
NO RATINGS
Well, I can't say that this particular article pertains to "Made by Monkeys" but perhaps falls under the categorey of "Fixed by Monkeys".  However, I am completely sympathetic, having done the EXACT same thing on my 2004 super-charged mustang GT.  I lost about 4 quarts of synthetic oil (at $6/qt) just driving the car of the ramps and back into the street before I noticed I was leaving a big trail of oil.  Interestingly enough, when I installed the new oil filter and gasket, I did kind of feel that something was a little different when I tightened it down, but I thought it might have some grime or metal splinters in the threads.  I should've looked closer.  On a good note, it's definitely one the of those mistakes that only make once in your lifetime.  :)

Stephen
User Rank
Gold
Re: Better safe than sorry
Stephen   11/23/2011 9:16:27 AM
NO RATINGS
Try PB Blaster or Kano Labs "Kroil" when the fire-wrench isn't practical, and remember to always check sealing surfaces when changing gasketed or O-ring'd parts!

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Decayed Gaskets
Alexander Wolfe   11/23/2011 7:36:12 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, Tim. I'm definitely going to give PB Blaster a try. Still, I think there are some situations where you have to apply, er, more than elbow grease (or grease in a can). My brother-in-law was telling me about changing the tie rods on his van, and how he had to jack it up and use a blowtorch to heat things up so he could remove them.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Decayed Gaskets
Tim   11/22/2011 6:31:17 PM
I have found that PB Blaster is the all around best penetrating lubricant (anti Loctite) for use on just about any fastener.  I had a 1990 Ford F150 that had seen a lot of salt from Pennsylvania roads that had basically eaten the undercoat.  Long story short, I had a lot of rust on all off the fasterners.  PB was the only thing that did the trick in loosening the fasteners.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Decayed Gaskets
Ann R. Thryft   11/22/2011 3:31:31 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the info on anti-seize compound. Lug nuts are not something you want to get loose over time, so perhaps grease is not the answer. I'd like to think there's something out there more like Formula 409, temporary but powerful.

wbswenberg
User Rank
Platinum
Oil on Motorcycle tire
wbswenberg   11/22/2011 3:27:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes I had the same problem from the main drive seal on my '79 sx650 Yamaha.  And I did a poor replacement job.  After that I used aircraft permetex on the seal.  And in WA you know it was raining both times.

RonChownyk
User Rank
Iron
Re: Decayed Gaskets
RonChownyk   11/22/2011 3:23:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Several manufacturers market an anti-sieze compound which usually consists of a high-temperature grease with fine aluminum and/or copper particles in suspension.  I've sucessfully used it on lug nuts in the past, but I'm not sure it's recommended.  Living in Michigan, I was more concerned with rusted lugs breaking off when trying to change a tire, than with the nuts accidentally becoming loose over time.  Not sure if that would happen, but it does seem like a possibility.

Anti-sieze was also great for the connector on those old sealed-beam headlamps.  The corrosion on the connection occasionally caused the blade connector on the headlight to break off in the plastic receptacle.  When replacing headlights, I always coated the blade connectors with anti-sieze compound.

Most recently I've used the copper anti-sieze (which is very electrically conductive) to make bus bar connections and ensure good contact between large gauge wire and lugs.

But that doesn't help with stuck gaskets.  Anyone working on older vehicles knows that the fiber gaskets  behind fuel pumps, carburetors, etc. usually leave a residue that has to be scraped with a sharp blade.  There are gasket removing chemicals, but I'd be very, very afraid to spray them on an engine where they may get into the engine or onto painted parts.

There are suitable gasket materials available that will withstand temperature and chemical (motor oil, fuel, etc.) exposure, but it all boils down to cost.

 

<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
With erupting concern over police brutality, law enforcement agencies are turning to body-worn cameras to collect evidence and protect police and suspects. But how do they work? And are they even really effective?
A half century ago, cars were still built by people, not robots. Even on some of the country’s longest assembly lines, human workers installed windows, doors, hoods, engines, windshields, and batteries, with no robotic aid.
DuPont's Hytrel elastomer long used in automotive applications has been used to improve the way marine mooring lines are connected to things like fish farms, oil & gas installations, buoys, and wave energy devices. The new bellow design of the Dynamic Tethers wave protection system acts like a shock absorber, reducing peak loads as much as 70%.
As U.S. manufacturing booms, companies are beginning to invest in new equipment.
Automobili Lamborghini is joining the ranks of supercar makers who are moving to greener powertrains.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 15 - 19, An Introduction to Web Application Security
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service