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Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Looking for consistency
Beth Stackpole   10/18/2011 12:31:49 PM
Looks like a pretty interesting development and a big advancement over many vehicle infotainment systems. My guess is if they can deliver touch and gesture commands that mimic what people are used to with their smart phones and tablets, then they are definitely on to something. Once you get used to a certain way of interacting with a device, it's a boon to have it be consistent whether you're talking about your laptop, phone, or in-car GPS.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Looking for consistency
Jack Rupert, PE   10/18/2011 4:33:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Beth, I agree that consistency would be a great benefit to the auto interface system.  If it is based off of an existing standard (such as the iPhone) that may be an incentive for other manufacturers to implement the same general interface without worrying about a bunch of infringement suits.  It is frustrating when every car you get into has a different interface.  I used to think it was bad getting into a rental and couldn't easily locate standard switches.  Now its almost impossible when things are buried in a obscure menu system.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Looking for consistency in a vehicle UI
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   10/18/2011 6:03:14 PM
NO RATINGS

All I can think is, “Finally!”  What takes us so long to break the mental paradigms that, once achieved, seem so obvious-?  10 years ago it was cameras, touch screens, bluetooth, GPS and MP3 players.  Hey! Lets incorporate them into Cellphones!  Seemed like stellar thinking at the time. (who would EVER need a camera in a Phone-?!) Now the same technologies which have come to be “expected” in the pervasive Smart-Phone arena is contemplated as Brilliant when placed in a motor vehicle. Well, it certainly is a good idea.  BT, GPS, and MP3 have already become common. Soon, haptic response, audio feedback, and LARGE PRINT on the dashboard screens will be common place in all models, in only a few years. Why, because its brilliant-?  No, I think because its obvious.  It will soon become “expected”.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Durability of this hardware?
TJ McDermott   10/19/2011 11:33:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Will this new hardware last as long as the vehicle?  HA!  It's perfectly reasonable for a car to last for 10 to 15 years.  Such a system would be a dinosaur near the end of the life of the car, if it lasted that long.  Realistically, you're going to be replacing it after 5 years.  At what cost?

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Hands on wheel, eyes on road
Battar   10/21/2011 12:23:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Anything that takes the drivers hands off the wheel and eyes off the road is a bad idea. I don't like the idea od drivers fooling around with touchscreens and reading LCD screens at 55mph with traffic coming the other way. What do we really need when driving other than a radio? My Nissan has all the important buttons on the steering wheel, and doesn't distract me with info on the dash screen.



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