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Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Mayan waterfall
Rob Spiegel   11/21/2011 2:35:13 PM
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Hey, lightvixon,

Have you considered submitting your gadget to Design News? We're always looking for new gadgets and we pay $500 for the gadget Freaks we run.

Send me an email, and I'll send along the details: rob.spiegel@ubm.com

lightvixen
User Rank
Iron
Re: Mayan waterfall
lightvixen   11/5/2011 8:46:08 PM
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You are quite right - notce I didn't comment on the design, jus the ligthing. We designed a 10-foot diameter,  9-foot long chandelier composed of 5,500 glass fibre optics light guides that has 9 colors pllus combinations for Christmas, Easter and Fourth of July, all push button operated.  It only consumes 2070 watts, and runs from 5 PM to 2 AM daily. Patrons entering the restaurant for the first time all say, WOW!

Staber Dearth
User Rank
Silver
Re: Mayan waterfall
Staber Dearth   11/4/2011 10:52:09 AM
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Cool, but not exactly groundbreaking.  If they put their mind to it, they could come up with a far more engaging dynamic and fluid display. I've seen more exciting music to visual displays on a computer screen with your choice of 1000's of effects.  Engaging project though.  Take it to the next level for true genius.  What would Steve Jobs do with this?

lightvixen
User Rank
Iron
Mayan waterfall
lightvixen   10/15/2011 9:36:55 PM
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Ingenious idea!  However, glass fire optics (GFO) functional architectural lighting would be a better lightng choice because::

1.  It is sustainable as long as needed -  current LEDs may have a lamp life of only 25,000 hours (five years).

2.  GFO is still the most energy efficient technology now known.  Additional energy has to be used to dissipate the heat created by the LED driver.

3.  Automated controls of color, motion and dimming are operated with a single push buttom with GFO.

4.  Even light is provided, instead of the blotches of LED chips.

5.  GFO works safely under water, while outdoor-type LEDs would cost three times as much as conventional ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Get the party started
Charles Murray   10/14/2011 10:42:37 AM
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I have no idea what I would do with this, but I like it.

Maya Engineering
User Rank
Iron
Photo it is not.
Maya Engineering   10/14/2011 10:28:27 AM
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1 saves
This is an illustration, not a photo.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Get the party started
Rob Spiegel   10/13/2011 11:51:40 AM
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Good call, Beth. This gadget is almost exactly the same thing as the disco ball.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Get the party started
Beth Stackpole   10/13/2011 10:30:06 AM
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Cool device. Looks to me like the modern-day equivalent of the seventies disco ball. Gadget well done.



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