HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
williamlweaver
User Rank
Platinum
BoogieBoard RIP
williamlweaver   10/6/2011 3:28:19 PM
I agree with your assesment. I'm not really sure what type of product they were trying to produce. Unfortunatly, it looks like their entire design purpose was to create a paperless piece of paper for the sake of being green. I'm not sure I go through 50,000 sheets of tablet paper in my own lifetime, but I guess they are quoting the lifetime of the product.

The BoogieBoard Rip is due in November 2011. It saves images to a microSD card.

I don't want to pile on, but the marketing folks that named it the BoogieBoard R.I.P. need a drawing board of their own...

Greg Stirling
User Rank
Platinum
Monkeys Messed Up My Boogie Board
Greg Stirling   10/6/2011 4:03:34 PM
NO RATINGS
A USB port and the ability to download a .jpg or .pdf would seem like the minimum requirement.  Sounds like yet another large team of college grads first attempt at product design.  Could have hired a few people who know what they are doing.

Actually spent more for the design and now have an inferior product..

etmax
User Rank
Gold
Re: BoogieBoard RIP
etmax   10/6/2011 7:59:08 PM
NO RATINGS
Well I have to say I wouldn't be bothered by the contrast if it's per the picture here, as it is still very readable even though not ideal, but I agree with your battery marking assessment. The lack of credible means to transfer the content to a PC though is for me a major issue. It's just too inconvenient to consider using. I'd rather use notepad on my iPhone or something like it. I await version 2 with anticipation, R.I.P :-) someone hasn't heard about the GM Nova in Mexico :-)

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Bad, Boogered, Boogie Board
William K.   10/6/2011 10:24:09 PM
NO RATINGS
If the thing does not have any means to offload the images that are drawn on it, what good is it? If it saves to permanent memory it may have some value, but the major value would be in serving as an off-line input device. 

As for the battery markings, with two batteries you have four ways to put them in, and three of them are wrong. All good products have battery polarity not only well marked, but the connections are made to be intuitively obvious to at least a lot of people. I would have examined the product manual to find the correct battery orientation. 

But before you give up on the contrast you need to verify that the batteries are not the problem, since poor contrast is a fairly common symptom of weak batteries. If you don't have at least three volts across the ends of the battery string then they are not at full charge, and you should try putting in a new set that has enough output. 

tedbeau
User Rank
Silver
Several bad ideas here
tedbeau   10/7/2011 7:59:12 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree it sounds like the battery cover design was confusing. I don't know why they would have two sets of + signs. I also don't understand how it could even run at all if the batteries were not installed properly.

Reading the description however, I have to agree with the others that said if they didn't design in a USB port so you could save your sketches and notes the device is total useless. Even the new model that allows you to save to a microcard is a poor design. This requires you to have a card reader attached to your computer and then hopefully  they are not using an obscure or propritary file format, or you will not be able to do anything with the files after you save them.

With no means to save the sketches I see the device as useless, the micro card soultions is a kludge of a fix, but better than nothing, if only barely. I believe the original poster said he paid $60 for the device. I think he would have been better off saving a little longer and buying on of the new tablet PCs. At least they allow saving printing and internet.

 

Ray Jorgenson
User Rank
Silver
Re: BoogieBoard RIP
Ray Jorgenson   10/7/2011 9:54:19 AM
NO RATINGS
There's actually another 'device' on the market that handles this need just as well. It's called 'a pencil & paper'. No batteries needed. Costs about a dollar.

D. Sherman
User Rank
Silver
Re: Bad, Boogered, Boogie Board
D. Sherman   10/7/2011 1:15:47 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point about the battery voltage.  I'm still seeing a whole lot of new products in which the manufacturer somewhere in the fine print says that alkaline batteries should be used rather than rechargeables. Alkalines put out 1.4 volts, whereas NiCd and NiMH puts out 1.2 volts. The difference between 2.8 and 2.4 volts is usually enough to affect the operation of the devices. This is inexcusable on the part of the engineers and frustrating to consumers who expect all AA or AAA batterie to work equally well, and are trying to "go green" (or go cheap) by using rechargeables. Everything designed today that runs on a pair of AA or AAA cells should be designed and tested work down to 2.2 volts.

If not, put in a 3-cell holder and let the marketeers whine about the "form factor" being too large. What's better, a device that is slim and doesn't work or is slightly larger and does? In this case, however, I suspect the poor display is a result of very hard push to keep costs down and no amount of battery voltage wouild improve the contrast.

I also can't imagine what purpose there is in a device that is nothing more than a poor subsitute for a pad of paper. With paper you get better resolution, better contrast, and full color capability. You also get the ability to save (for thousands of years if desired) your work in a format that is inherently human-readable without any additional technology. Need a quck-erase function? tear of the sheet of paper, throw it out, and start with another sheet. In ecological terms, there is no way a pad of paper can have anywhere near the carbon footprint of a pad-sized globally-manufactureed electronic device, and of course paper is biodegadable, non-toxic, and suitable for use as fuel in waste-to-energy plants.

 

All in all, this is the most useless application of sillicon and software I've ever heard of. Even a musical greeting card at least provides some real value above that of a plain greeting card.

trainliker
User Rank
Iron
Re: BoogieBoard RIP
trainliker   10/10/2011 1:03:33 PM
NO RATINGS
D. Sherman has a good point about actual paper looking pretty good compared to this.  But Johnny Carson said it long ago.  Somebody (from HP I think) was on the Tonight Show demonstrating a new little tablet product where you could write on the flat screen with a stylus and then save what you wrote to view later.  Johnny Carson took the wind out of the guys sails by saying "Don't we already have something like that?  Called a pencil and paper?"  The guy's smiling face went blank.

Bluebee
User Rank
Iron
Re: BoogieBoard RIP
Bluebee   10/10/2011 11:09:35 PM
NO RATINGS
To understand what this board does the fine print has to be read and to understand how it works some research has to be done.

A USB connection is not there, because there is no electronics inside this Boogie Board. It has a special LCD which changes colour with pressure, and holds these color changes until an electrical impulse releases the impressions. Really simple, but ingenious. It's a gadget, anyway.

The same company which developed this Boogie Board developed LCDs which don't loose their content when power off, like the Boogie Board does, but it has electronic circuits to be able to write on it like on a normal LCD. The great advantage is, that it does need power only for writing and wiping, but doesn't need any power to hold the data. This is a revolutionary product. Together with an FRAM microprocessor it is now possible to build text and graphic devices with the lowest energy ever possible: no energy needed anymore - only temporary when updating data. Numerous applications are possible now, which haven't been possible in the past. Not developed by monkeys.

williamlweaver
User Rank
Platinum
Re: BoogieBoard RIP
williamlweaver   10/11/2011 7:13:52 AM
NO RATINGS
What you describe is most definitely nifty technology, but I belive the original review and comments were specifically questioning the Use Case of the product. The original BoogieBoard is an electronic incarnation of the "Magic Slate" - a layered device containing a sheet of cellophane which covers a layer of black parafin. As the user "draws" on the cellophane using a stylus, the cellophane makes contact with the black parafin below, creating an image. The Image can then be errased by lifting the cellophane sheet from the parafin and the process is repeated. Amazon currently sells Magic Tablets in packs of 72 for US $12.99 (18 cents each)

The BoogieBoard has the same functionality at 33,000% the cost of the Magic Slate.

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Take a look at the top 20 US undergraduate engineering programs. Then tell us -- did your school make the cut?
Producing high-quality end-production metal parts with additive manufacturing for applications like aerospace and medical requires very tightly controlled processes and materials. New standards and guidelines for machines and processes, materials, and printed parts are underway from bodies such as ASTM International.
Engineers at the University of San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering have designed biobatteries on commercial tattoo paper, with an anode and cathode screen-printed on and modified to harvest energy from lactate in a person’s sweat.
A Silicon Valley company has made the biggest splash yet in the high-performance end of the electric car market, announcing an EV that zips from 0 to 60 mph in 3.4 seconds and costs $529,000.
The biggest robot swarm to date is made of 1,000 Kilobots, which can follow simple rules to autonomously assemble into predetermined shapes. Hardware and software are open-source.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 8 - 12, Get Ready for the New Internet: IPv6
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service