HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Carl Fink
User Rank
Iron
Re: Common sense, but far from widely practiced
Carl Fink   9/15/2011 10:10:34 AM
NO RATINGS
"Why aren't more companies further along the path?"  Several factors come into play.  PLM tool maturity and legacy programs are two big drivers.  From my perspective, the PLM toolsets have only recently begun to look to be capable to truly manage the product data across the entire lifecycle.  That said, many companies have been trying to use the capabilities that have been out there for the past 10-15 years, though they were limited by tool capability in just how far they could extend the PLM environment. Additionally, they likely customized what was available to make it work for them, potentially making backwards-compatibility more difficult.  Because of that effort to date, it's more challenging to move to new tools and processes if your product lifecycles are lengthy - it can be cost-prohibitive to change PLM toolsets mid-program, and they may not be easily backward-compatible.  Long product lifecycles therefore limit the opportunity to move to the new tools and processes, assuming you can justify their development and implementation expense for use on a new program, whenever those come along.  If new programs don't come along very often, then you may not have the opportunity for the transformational-type of change that today's highly integrated PLM toolsets offer.  If you have a new program start and the capital to invest in the IT and process development to leverage the integrated PLM tool capability, then a company definitely should take the leap - it's where we need to go...

Michael Grieves
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Environmental compliance forces PLM
Michael Grieves   9/14/2011 10:48:37 PM
NO RATINGS
You are correct. My position is that, without PLM, Design for the Environment (DfE) initatives make companies feel good but are wasted efforts. If the information about how the product was designed to be disposed of is not available decades or even a century from now when the product comes out of service, the product will simply be sent to a landfill.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Environmental compliance forces PLM
Rob Spiegel   9/14/2011 1:28:58 PM
NO RATINGS
Since the responsibility for environmental compliance has settled onto the shoulders of design engineers, a view toward PLM has become a necessity. The design process now has to include a view from conception through -- ultimately -- product disposal -- and everything in-between.

Greg Stirling
User Rank
Platinum
PLM: The Ultimate Engineering Job Saver
Greg Stirling   9/14/2011 1:12:33 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, the PLM design approach is the way to go.  In my ideal design process, all the relevant parties gather all the requirements in the beginning.  Then all the concepts from all the parties are gathered and explored like an upside down pyramid, narrowing down the choices to one or two.  Then the machine is designed, built, and tested... 

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Common sense, but far from widely practiced
Beth Stackpole   9/14/2011 8:48:21 AM
NO RATINGS
This view of product development seems to be echoed by pundits and vendors and even the largest product producers in all of the major industry sectors, and the PLM sector is enjoying strong growth, which would indicate support for this vision.

Nevertheless, even though we now have the technology to support these practices, it's surprising how many companies are still so early on in this transition. It seems like a no-brainer for manufacturers to embrace core PLM concepts around developing and verifying product designs in the virtual world along with taking a product-centric, information-driven approach as opposed to siloed development groups. Why aren't more companies further along the path?



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
A bold, gold, open-air coupe may not be the ticket to automotive nirvana for every consumer, but Lexus’ LF-C2 concept car certainly turned heads at the recent Los Angeles Auto Show. What’s more, it may provide a glimpse of the luxury automaker’s future.
Perhaps you didn't know that there are a variety of classes, both live and archived, offered via the Design News Continuing Education Center (CEC) sponsored by Digi-Key? The best part – they are free!
Engineer comic Don McMillan explains the fun engineers have with team-building exercises. Can you relate?
The complexity of diesel engines means optimizing their performance requires a large amount of experimentation. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a very useful and intuitive tool in this, and cold flow analysis using CFD is an ideal approach to study the flow characteristics without going into the details of chemical reactions occurring during the combustion.
The damage to Sony from the cyber attack seems to have been heightened by failure to follow two basic security rules.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jan 12 - 16, Programmable Logic - How do they do that?
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service