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Tom Drechsler
User Rank
Silver
Re: Why buy new?
Tom Drechsler   9/14/2011 10:15:11 AM
NO RATINGS
I'd like to hear from some consumer electronics designers on this topic; My 5+ year old Kenmore Eltie needed the control panel replaced, most likely because of >cheap< silver ink flex. I know from direct experieince that the cycle life of switches using silver ink is limited. Can't solder it to fix it either. Given the very low cost of kapton flex in volume, I find this unforgiveable.

My 25 year old Jennair has had the control panel rebuilt a half dozen times. Parts are no longer available & my next home project will be to remodel the ktichen & replace it (ugh). At least I will end up with a  gas stove again but  I am sure I will have the same issues with .. control panels!

averagejoe72677
User Rank
Gold
Low Quality New Appliances
averagejoe72677   9/14/2011 9:53:10 AM
NO RATINGS
It is apparent that the quality of appliances being made today has taken a serious nosedive. Appliances such as refrigerators, dishwashers, stoves etc. used to last 25-30 years or more. So much for the term "durable goods". The dramatic and seemingly sudden reduction in life of appliances in general, would be a fantastic opportunity for one or more companies to build a lasting quality line of these products, as discontent customers of current offerings would beat a path to your door. It appears an industry wide cost reduction program were put in place at the expense of a multitude of dissatisfied customers. I will keep my older appliances going as long as possible and hopefully better quality products will emerge before I have to bite the bullet and replace them. 

 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Why buy new?
Rob Spiegel   9/13/2011 11:15:37 AM
NO RATINGS
Beth has a point. I had an extreme version of an old refrigerator once. I lived in a house built in the 1920s. The house was charming, but the kitchen was very small. The only refrigerator that fit the micro refrigerator space was tiny. The freezer compartment was actually inside the fridge.

The unit was very reliable, but it wasn't much fun.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Why buy new?
Beth Stackpole   9/13/2011 10:59:00 AM
NO RATINGS
In theory, I have to agree with you, Lauren. But who isn't seduced by the new gadgetry and sleek look of new appliances compared with the old. You can't remodel a kitchen and keep the aging stuff around without a major overhaul appearing dated. That said, there is the question to be asked about why these new models don't perform well or don't last longer. I think your point about keeping them around as long as there are spare parts is sound, but my guess is those part reserves dry up in no time so we all cave into our urges for those shiny new appliances every 10 years!

 

 

Lauren Muskett
User Rank
Platinum
Why buy new?
Lauren Muskett   9/13/2011 10:41:08 AM
NO RATINGS
After reading about the constantly failing new appliances it makes the most sense to keep the old ones around. Finding replacement parts for the old appliances make sense, but I wonder if they are easy to get a hold of.

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