HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/2
Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Practical Engineering Education
Beth Stackpole   8/20/2011 8:37:10 AM
NO RATINGS
So are you saying TJ, that providing the real-world design tools in the classroom to do simulation or virtual prototpying doesn't go far enough in terms of delivering that "nuts and bolts" education? Are you saying that there needs to be a hands-on physical prototyping aspect as well so students get their hands "dirty" not just with the technology tools, but with "bending real metal" etc. to learn by doing? If so, that's an interesting point given all of the focus today on virtual prototyping.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Practical Engineering Education
TJ McDermott   8/19/2011 3:50:49 PM
NO RATINGS
The literal nuts and bolts are being ignored.  Matlab / Solidworks in the curriculum gives a more practical basis, but you're still talking about simulations.  There should also be something tangible, something memorable to the class.  Doing a root-cause failure analysis on the 737 skin failure earlier this year works well in the Matlab simulations (varying rivet hole size, for instance). But that should be followed by several lab demonstrations to prove the Matlab simulations actually jibe with the real world.  Watching a test to failure of something they initially design will be a memory students carry for their entire life.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great example of good teaching methods
Beth Stackpole   8/19/2011 1:01:03 PM
NO RATINGS
It seems to me that more participation from vendors like MathWorks should be a no-brainer. By providing their software and support to engineering programs and doing their part to add a practical slant to the curriculum, they get a built-in potential customer base as graduating students are already versed and hooked on their programs.

There is definitely lots of activity in terms of design tool vendors sponsoring student competitions and doing regular donations of software. Let's hope that all of the effort pays off in terms of helping to fuel this shift.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Great example of good teaching methods
Charles Murray   8/19/2011 12:49:37 PM
NO RATINGS
It can be easy to criticize engineering curricula for not providing a hands-on learning experience, but hands-on experience can be difficult and expensive for universities. Kudos to The MathWorks for lending a helping hand here. Engineering programs need this kind of help to provide a solid learning experience.

Ivan Kirkpatrick
User Rank
Platinum
Practical Engineering Education
Ivan Kirkpatrick   8/19/2011 12:31:33 PM
NO RATINGS
I can really appreciate the practical aspects of an engineering curriculum.  As interesting as the theoretical foundations are, engineering requires a practical approach.  To me the Scientists were usually engaged in more theory and research while the engineers were usually trying to figure out how to put some of those interesting discoveries to work.

A good hands on education that emphasizes solutions to problems is usually appreciated by engineering students.  

<<  <  Page 2/2


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Samsung's Galaxy line of smartphones used to fare quite well in the repairability department, but last year's flagship S5 model took a tumble, scoring a meh-inducing 5/10. Will the newly redesigned S6 lead us back into star-studded territory, or will we sink further into the depths of a repairability black hole?
Fifteen European research centers have launched EuroCPS to help European companies develop innovative products for the Internet of Things.
Get your Allman Brothers albums ready. The iconic Volkswagen Microbus may be poised for a comeback, and this time it could be electric.
In 2003, the world contained just over 500 million Internet-connected devices. By 2010, this figure had risen to 12.5 billion connected objects, almost six devices per individual with access to the Internet. Now, as we move into 2015, the number of connected 'things' is expected to reach 25 billion, ultimately edging toward 50 billion by the end of the decade.
NASA engineer Brian Trease studied abroad in Japan as a high school student and used to fold fast-food wrappers into cranes using origami techniques he learned in library books. Inspired by this, he began to imagine that origami could be applied to building spacecraft components, particularly solar panels that could one day send solar power from space to be used on earth.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 20 - 24, Taking the Internet of Things to the Cloud
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service