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jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Wow! What an incredible machine.
jmiller   8/12/2011 11:45:38 AM
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Bravo on the creation of such a complex combination of tools fitting into one machine.  It reminds of today's transformers.  Or, perhaps, a really cool set of legos.  I really like the ability of using technology to remove the potential for human errors.  Being able to control which programs can run with with tools on what tables.

It reminds me of some of the plastic tooling houses I have worked with.  In order to prevent the opportunity for human error when different plastic tools are loaded into molding machines they require manifolds on all of their tools.  One hot line hook-up and one cold line hook-up.  Not necessarily new technology.  And definitely not as cool as the set-up described in this article.  But another way to minimize the chance of humans hooking something up wrong.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Wow! What an incredible machine.
Rob Spiegel   8/12/2011 11:55:52 AM
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Thanks, jmiller, for hanging in there through this very long Sherlok Ohms posting. I was concerned when this was posted that readers would be put off the the length and complexity of the post. At least in your case, that didn't seem to be a problem.

It is a fascinating story.

oldtimer8080
User Rank
Gold
Re: Wow! What an incredible machine.
oldtimer8080   8/12/2011 3:07:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Note that this system is just one step away from full automation .

Overpaid Union Workers please note...

 

The ( now out of business ) robotics compnay I had worked for had a prototype rotating tray inventory system it used. 

It was designed to be part of a fully automated inventory handling system with a robot delivery system for the parts.

It's too bad no one wanted such a system 10 years ago....

 

 

 

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Wow! What an incredible machine.
jmiller   8/12/2011 11:45:38 AM
NO RATINGS
Bravo on the creation of such a complex combination of tools fitting into one machine.  It reminds of today's transformers.  Or, perhaps, a really cool set of legos.  I really like the ability of using technology to remove the potential for human errors.  Being able to control which programs can run with with tools on what tables.

It reminds me of some of the plastic tooling houses I have worked with.  In order to prevent the opportunity for human error when different plastic tools are loaded into molding machines they require manifolds on all of their tools.  One hot line hook-up and one cold line hook-up.  Not necessarily new technology.  And definitely not as cool as the set-up described in this article.  But another way to minimize the chance of humans hooking something up wrong.

TimDaro
User Rank
Iron
Elementary, really
TimDaro   8/14/2011 1:26:12 PM
NO RATINGS
In full disclosure, we're the ad/PR agency for Bertsche, the subject of this tale.  

Among all our clients, Rich Bertsche is one of the most innovative and creative engineers I've encountered in 36 years working for such fellows.  

They look at a customer's problem and approach it with two essential skills...

First, they bring a wealth of experience building other machines for companies in the aerospace business, in this case, to the job.  

Secondly, they put no restrictions on their thinking, other than to solve the problem in an efficient, cost-effective and practical manner.  

These are traits of all great American machine builders, a tribe that represents the core of our agency.  

Rich's team solved the problem, even producing some unintended positives for the customer...the identity of whom must remain a mystery, per their edict.  Pretty well-known airplane company, though.  

Nonetheless, this story proves many truths, one of which is that, despite all the fuzzy thinking being circulated about the impending demise of American manufacturing and the need for "reshoring", a rather ridiculous concept, when you read articles such as this one, the fact is American ingenuity and engineering expertise are still able to bring together myriad components and manufacturing technologies to solve production problems better, faster and more economically than anybody else.  

We're proud to work for the Bertche bunch...and many others such talented sleuths!  

Sherlock's PR Guy  

 

 

TimDaro
User Rank
Iron
Elementary, really
TimDaro   8/14/2011 1:26:14 PM
NO RATINGS
In full disclosure, we're the ad/PR agency for Bertsche, the subject of this tale.  

Among all our clients, Rich Bertsche is one of the most innovative and creative engineers I've encountered in 36 years working for such fellows.  

They look at a customer's problem and approach it with two essential skills...

First, they bring a wealth of experience building other machines for companies in the aerospace business, in this case, to the job.  

Secondly, they put no restrictions on their thinking, other than to solve the problem in an efficient, cost-effective and practical manner.  

These are traits of all great American machine builders, a tribe that represents the core of our agency.  

Rich's team solved the problem, even producing some unintended positives for the customer...the identity of whom must remain a mystery, per their edict.  Pretty well-known airplane company, though.  

Nonetheless, this story proves many truths, one of which is that, despite all the fuzzy thinking being circulated about the impending demise of American manufacturing and the need for "reshoring", a rather ridiculous concept, when you read articles such as this one, the fact is American ingenuity and engineering expertise are still able to bring together myriad components and manufacturing technologies to solve production problems better, faster and more economically than anybody else.  

We're proud to work for the Bertche bunch...and many others such talented sleuths!  

Sherlock's PR Guy  

 

 

Critic
User Rank
Platinum
Ad?
Critic   8/19/2011 11:02:15 AM
NO RATINGS
This "case" reads like an advertisement for a flexible machining center.  This is not about an investigation or solution of a particular problem, and one of the unmentioned factors is the cost of the system.  Please be careful, Design News, about what you publish as a "case," or this column will morph into ads, which are generally not as interesting to read.



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