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Beth Stackpole
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Re: Biotech frontier
Beth Stackpole   8/4/2011 8:12:43 AM
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I have to agree with Alex on the potential for this intersection of technologies and disciplines and the impact it is having on medical advancements. Obviously, biomedical engineering is an important field, but I wonder what other new cross-discipline domains and training programs are emerging to better blend "the biology stuff with the non-biology stuff."

As someone who recently lost a family member (post transplant) to advanced lung disease, this story is particularly relevant. It's heartening to see how much process they're making, and that added detail about the first prototype being developed with additive manufacturing technologies points up another emerging area that has huge potential for emerging medical applications. Great story, Doug.

Alexander Wolfe
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Biotech frontier
Alexander Wolfe   8/4/2011 7:58:26 AM
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The intersection of biology and mechanical, electrical, computer and manufacturing engineering is really where the action is going to be in the 21st century. This story is a great example. I wonder, in your experience, Doug, do the medical professionals who are part of these teams have enough understanding of the non-biology stuff to be able to make as big a contribution as possible. I.e., if there was more cross-training, would some of these things evolve in faster or different ways? I realize that, in this case and in many others, the materials, cost, and miniaturization are the gating challenges. I'm just speculating as to the energizing effect of more cross-pollination within the collaborative teams. Great story.

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