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soljacobs
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Iron
Re: Nine Years!
soljacobs   8/9/2011 4:15:52 PM
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Alkaline consumer batteries have a crimped seal. Lithium thionyl chloride batteries have a glass to metal seal made to last for decades.

soljacobs
User Rank
Iron
Re: Nine Years!
soljacobs   8/9/2011 4:13:04 PM
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Actually Tadiran has been making these cells for 30 years and makes many millions each year on totally automated equipment.

You can find Tadiran batteries in toll tags, such as the EZPASS, in automatic water, gas or electric meters, pressure sensors in tires, tracking devices, etc.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Nine Years!
TJ McDermott   8/9/2011 4:08:09 PM
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Sounds like custom-made, not mass-produced.  That should be the case for consumer batteries, but I bet everyone here has opened up a flashlight long idle in the junk drawer that had goo oozing from the batteries, fouling the interior.

soljacobs
User Rank
Iron
Re: Nine Years!
soljacobs   8/9/2011 4:04:51 PM
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a properly designed and built lithium cell can operate for over 25 years without leaks. Tadiran has proven that.

soljacobs
User Rank
Iron
Re: End of Life
soljacobs   8/9/2011 4:03:41 PM
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Lithium thionyl chloride batteries have no heavy metals or mercury and are very easy to dispose of.

soljacobs
User Rank
Iron
Re: End of Life
soljacobs   8/9/2011 4:02:14 PM
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Not exactly.

The cost per operating life is negligable.

Aclara, a manufaturer of automated meter reading products, has its original units operating for over 25 years with Tadiran batteries, without replacements or recharging.

 

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
The very long life battery systems
William K.   8/1/2011 9:13:59 PM
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Energy harvesting systems have a lot of parts and thus reduce reliability. In addition they take up space and add cost. Aside from that, the source for the harvested energy may change over the years. 

As for recycling them, possibly, but they are a such a small portion of the product stream that fixating on them would be a waste of time for all except troublemakers.

There are not that many applications that really need such a long life, and none of them include consumer products, for which the intended lifespan is six to ten months. Why put a long life battery in a device that will be in the landfill in less than a year?

Using the most low powered electronic devices is certainly a good choice insolving the problem from the other end.

tinkerg
User Rank
Iron
Harvesting
tinkerg   8/1/2011 1:14:29 PM
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I would think this would be a great application to put some type of energy harvesting system in to place?

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Re: End of Life
Battar   8/1/2011 9:22:19 AM
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1. They are expensive - maybe too expensive for a consumer product.

2. They suffer from passivation, so you have to keep them in a constant state of discharge - this limits their usefull life to less than a decade.

3. They have limited maximum current draw - a few tens of milliamps. 

So they are fime for telemetry applications where the equipment spends most of it's time asleep, but it's a product suitable only for very specific uses. 

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Closer and Closer to Perprtual motion
jmiller   7/29/2011 11:56:51 PM
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Now we all know perpetual motion isn't possible.  However, when you talk about batteries and the ability to capture energy that would otherwise be considered wasted.  It just shows how much potential there is out there.  Whether it be capturing the energy of a car as it slows down and generating energy with it, or capturing the energy while one walks I think the opportunities are just endless.  And combining enery generation with the advancement of energy storage is just really exciting.

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