HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Jluminais
User Rank
Silver
Re: Off the grid
Jluminais   8/10/2011 9:34:55 AM
NO RATINGS
Run out of Garbage?  Your kidding, right?

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Off the grid
Tim   7/24/2011 8:03:57 PM
NO RATINGS
The ability to convert garbage to electricity takes care of two of the major challenges to going Off The Grid.  A garbage to electricity power plant is probably just a cost effective as a home wind mill or a home solar array.  The problem that arises is the same as any other alternative energy.  What do you do when there is no garbage, wind, or sun?

Greg Stirling
User Rank
Platinum
Convert Garbage to Electricity at Home
Greg Stirling   7/24/2011 5:58:29 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, the concept of Cold Fusion emitting no radiation is fantastic, and from what I read, it may just remain a fantasy.  Regular Fusion is making some progress, but may be decades before anything useful comes out of it.

I like the backyard generator idea, and this concept appears to be sound, the gassificaton process produces no greenhouse gas since it is burned in an oxygen starved environment.  The remaining gasses simply run a generator.

On a large scale I understand this is already being done.

The problem with the backyard scale unit is the cost.  This System if sold commercially would have to meet, city codes, federal EPA requirments, UL, CE etc. This would crank up the cost of the system.  More complex hardware, controls and safety is required here than on a solar cell array for example.  If the price tag could be brought down to say under $10K and produce 2+ kilowatts, I could see how it may be feasable.  After all we do burn fuel hauling away garbage, why not generate electricity close to where it is being used...

David McCollum
User Rank
Gold
Re: Bad idea
David McCollum   7/22/2011 5:22:37 PM
NO RATINGS
I don't think it would be economically feasible on an individual basis. My interest is in a system that reduces the amount of solid waste and is environmentally responsible. I don't believe backyard unit would ever pay itself off. We have a garbage-to-steam facility here, but I haven't seen any information about its output.

I'll admit that I'm not enough of a country boy to raise chickens, but my neighbor has some bees, and I've never had a problem there. He always brings me a couple of frames of honey every year and everything that blooms at my house seems well pollinated. I hardly ever see a bee.

SoCalPE
User Rank
Gold
Waste gas
SoCalPE   7/22/2011 3:26:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Fusion Jr. sounds like a good backyard attempt for home energy creation.  I wonder how complicated the purification process is before the gas is usable or how pure the gases need to be.  I have thought about this in terms of using waste gas from home septic systems that are vented to the atmosphere.  Of course this has been done in commercial waste water treatment plants but how about at the home scale. All the homes in my neighborhood have septic tanks and it would be great to do something useful with that "free" combustible gas.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bad idea
Beth Stackpole   7/22/2011 2:26:44 PM
NO RATINGS
I have to agree with Doug. This is not something I'd want to see in my neighborhood, environmentally P.C. (politically correct) or not. I would think there'd be safety issues, unsightly issues, you name it. I thought the influx of my neighbors now raising chickens and honey bees in their yards was bad--this could put me over the edge.

Douglas Smock
User Rank
Platinum
Bad idea
Douglas Smock   7/22/2011 1:59:55 PM
NO RATINGS
My reaction is "why bother?" Plenty of towns ship trash to municipal reactors that burn trash and convert it to fuel in an efficient and clean manner. I seriously doubt that a chemical fusion reactor in your house is environemtnally friendly, or even efficient for that matter. Would it be "cool" to have a nuclear fusion unit that converts trash to fuel? I don't think so. Not in my house. It's news to me that nuclear fusion would operate on trash.

David McCollum
User Rank
Gold
A good idea
David McCollum   7/22/2011 10:52:19 AM
NO RATINGS
A couple of the links weren't working (or maybe it is my lousy connection today) but I'd be interested to see the end result of the operation. Does it actually incinerate the garbage/waste products and leave ash? How toxic (or not) is that ash? What is the efficiency of the combustion? What about output to the air in the event the combustion gasses are not recaptured. Could it be modified to operate on a large scale (factory or small community) to make a significant reduction in landfill input? Overlook me. . .I'm always scheming to be the next Thomas Edison.



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Last year you helped Design News and Allied Electronics crown its first-ever Gadget Freak of the Year, and we need your help again. Vote in round 2 of our second-annual contest.
The key to autonomous driving is not to forget about the driver, and to remember that passengers want a sense of control, as opposed to being utterly passive backseat drivers.
HP revealed more of its 3D printing plans in a recent webinar. Senior vice president of inkjet and graphics solution business Stephen Nigro spoke about how the technology works and expanded on HP's vision of open collaboration to commercialize its Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology for end-production, and open collaboration on new materials. He also said HP will create software to help users decide when to use Multi Jet Fusion versus conventional subtractive manufacturing.
Get a load of these strange product designs. What's in the water these design engineers are drinking?
The Dutch are known for their love of bicycling, and they’ve also long been early adopters of green-energy and smart-city technologies. So it seems fitting that a town in which painter Vincent van Gogh once lived has given him a very Dutch-like tribute -- a bike path lit by a special smart paint in the style of the artist's “Starry Night” painting.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 1 - 5, An Introduction to Embedded Software Architecture and Design
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service